Child Traumatic Stress

Inside the Mind of a 10-year-old: An ED Doctor's Perspective for Pediatricians

After a child has experienced a traumatic medical event involving a visit to the Emergency Department, the follow-up pediatrician visit is crucial to the patient's emotional recovery. Here's what pediatricians should know.

Refining a Web-based Tool to Help Children Recover from Trauma

With millions of children each year exposed to potentially traumatic events, there is a great need for accessible early preventive interventions that could promote recovery and decrease the chances of developing persistent posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS). But there is only a small number of published evaluation studies of such early interventions for children, and few have found clear evidence of preventing or reducing PTSS. We are working to close that gap with the development of a web-based intervention called Coping Coach.

Can Injury Pain Predict Posttraumatic Stress in Children?

New research from CIRP@CHOP suggests pain assessment using the Color Analogue Pain Scale, even during acute medical care, can play a role in screening for risk of ongoing Post Traumatic Stress symptoms.

Student-Trainee Perspective: Learning to Cure Chronic Tunnel Vision

In today's post, we are pleased to welcome guest blogger Megan E. Fitzgerald, a student clinical assistant at CIRP@CHOP. Read about how her six month co-operative internship at CIRP would become a cure for her chronic tunnel vision.

Cellie Coping Kit for Injury: Promoting Children’s Healthy Recovery

Read about the Cellie Coping Kit for Injury, a new coping tool that is designed for children ages 6 to 12 years. This research-based kit is part of a line of tools featuring Cellie, a stuffed toy, coping cards, and a book for caregivers created by team of researchers at CHOP.

New Resource Alert: Continuing Education Courses for Nurses

To help nurses build additional skills in how to provide trauma-informed care, the Center for Pediatric Traumatic Stress is now offering free continuing education courses on the HealthCareToolbox.org website. These trainings are based on the “DEF Protocol” which helps nurses address distress, emotional support, and family needs in a systematic manner.

What Nurses Know About Trauma-informed Care

Nurses play a key role in children’s physical and psychological recovery from injury. We are often the first to recognize and respond to the emotional impact of injury on families. A new study published in the Journal of Pediatric Nursing provides the first systematic look at what nurses think and do with regard to trauma-informed care for children.

Proactive Crisis Management and Recovery For School Shootings

It can be a formidable task to help a community to develop and practice a crisis management and response plan for a mass casualty event for one key reason: The inherent conflict in preparing for something that we hope will never occur. Here are key things to consider when developing a response.

Consider This Framework for Treating PTS in Children After Acute Medical Trauma

Working at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, I have been impressed by our medical teams’ efforts to support children and families by paying attention to both their physical treatment and recovery, as well as their emotional recovery. In assessing our patients for medical treatment, many questions need to be answered for our team to help promote optimal recovery and to minimize negative emotional reactions such as posttraumatic stress. We recently developed a new model to help organize our thought processes and questions around recovery from medical events and to fuel future research in understanding factors that are associated with child outcomes.

Early Intervention After Child Trauma: Do We Know What Works?

When traumatic events affect children we all want to help. In the aftermath of large-scale tragedies, communities are often deluged with donations and offers of assistance, not all of them useful. How to help in a way that is useful and supportive of children’s natural recovery processes is a pressing issue in the field of traumatic stress. Dr. Kassam-Adams proposes a guide to researchers and practitioners to meet the challenge.

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