Center for Injury Research and Prevention

CChIPS

ACIP Agenda is Set!

Registration is open for the 2018 Advances in Child Injury Prevention (ACIP) Conference, hosted by the Center for Child Injury Prevention Studies. Read on for an overview of the traffic safety-focused agenda.

Vision Zero Initiative and the Bumpy Road to Self-Driving Cars

Just like black boxes have helped the aeronautical industry fine-tune hardware and software and to install redundancy to maximize air traffic safety, one can hope the new self-driving technology will help us decrease the number of deaths on the road and reach the Vision Zero objective we are all striving to achieve.

Interviews, ROI, and Surprising Results: Read the 2017 CChIPS Annual Report

Today, the Center for Child Injury Prevention Studies (CChIPS) released its 2017 Annual Report, featuring snapshots of child safety-focused research projects completed during the 2016-2017 project year.

SHRP2 Data Generate Unique “All Crash” Rate for Teen Drivers

Naturalistic data provides a real-world look at how teen drivers crash. Read about a line of research comparing teen and adult drivers, which was recently recognized by the Association for the Advancement of Automotive Medicine.

Save the Date: Advances in Child Injury Prevention Conference, May 30-31, 2018

The Center for Child Injury Prevention Studies (CChIPS) will host the 2018 Advances in Child Injury Prevention (ACIP) Conference on May 30-31, 2018 in Plymouth, MI.

A New Year for CChIPS

The Center for Child Injury Prevention Studies (CChIPS) has launched a new research year. Read to find out more about the ten projects CChIPS investigators will be spearheading in 2017-2018.

A New Research Tool to Predict Young Driver Behavior

Today we are pleased to welcome a guest blog post from Santiago Ontañón, PhD, a research scientist and assistant professor at the College of Computing and Informatics at Drexel University. Dr. Ontañón led a study, “Learning to Predict Driver Behavior from Observation,” and recently presented on the findings at the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI) Spring Symposia on Learning from Observation of Humans at Stanford University.

Honoring the Entrepreneurial Spirit of a Child

Bishop Curry, the 10 year old son of a Toyota employee, came up with a design that he hoped might prevent hot car deaths among children in car seats. His father's quest to share this vision led to an invitation to tour Toyota's Collaborative Safety Research Center and attend the Center for Child Injury Prevention Studies' annual Advances in Child Injury Prevention conference. Read more to hear a conversation about their experience.

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