CChIPS

Student Engineers Get the Spotlight at Injury Biomechanics Symposium

Today, we are pleased to welcome a guest blog post from John Bolte, PhD, Director of the Injury Biomechanics Research Center at The Ohio State University (OSU). John discusses the Injury Biomechanics Symposium, where OSU hosts students from universities around the world to present their research.

New CChIPS Chair Looks Toward the Future

We would like to welcome a guest blog post from Schuyler St. Lawrence, the new CChIPS IAB Chair. Schuyler is the Assistant Manager for Safety Technical and Regulatory Affairs at Toyota Motor North America, Inc. Toyota is a founding member of CChIPS. Read more to learn about his long term vision for CChIPS.

Using the Microsoft Xbox Kinect Sensor™ for Child Safety Research

It is no surprise that researchers often seek out cost-effective ways to conduct rigorous research. What may be surprising, however, is that a new data collection tool being utilized by CIRP@CHOP investigators is part of a gaming system that many families have in their homes.

The Infinite Possibilities of Finite Element Modeling

CIRP training in motion: Using Finite Element Modeling to Reduce Car Crash Injuries

Nurturing an Industry Advisory Board

Let us assume it’s easier for a non-profit organization to maintain an advisory board than to build one. To do this, there is an important maxim to consider: The factors that motivate board members to join are different than the factors that motivate them to stay. And if you listen carefully to your board members, they will give you the keys to keeping them engaged and committed.   

Child Injury Prevention Holiday Wish List

In the spirit of my previous Thanksgiving post about items for which I’m grateful in the pediatric injury world, I thought I’d make my holiday “wish list” for the next year and beyond.

Improving Outcomes for Seriously Injured Children

When we think about trauma and prevention we often focus on death as the outcome. However, functional disability from trauma is far more common than death and can cause long-term physical and cognitive impairment despite inpatient rehabilitation. In fact, 95 percent of children and young adults survive moderate to severe trauma. How can we best measure these impairments in a standardized manner? What happens to these patients when they leave the hospital and inpatient rehabilitation? Are we doing all we can to ensure these children recover to reach their fullest potential?

Collaborating to Improve Car Seat Safety

Although a recent New York Times article on child restraint system misuse cautioned that car seat manufacturers and automakers do not collaborate on safety solutions, this partnership is thriving through CIRP@CHOP's Center for Child Injury Prevention Studies (CChIPS).

Babies Have a Say On Comfort of Rear-facing Car Seats

Read a guest blog post from CHOP's Center for Child Injury Prevention Studies (CChIPS) investigator Julie Bing of The Ohio State University. Julie discusses recent CChIPS research on the comfort of children in rear-facing vs. forward-facing child restraint systems.

Over the Top - The Case for the Tether

Recently, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) conducted in-person surveys of 479 drivers with forward-facing child restraints equipped with tether anchors. The study found that 56% of these restraints were installed with the tether, and 39% had correct installation of the tether. The drivers’ most common self-reported barriers to tether use were that that they did not know about the tether or they did not know how to use it. Read why it's important to emphasize the top tether in parent education...

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