Pediatric Biomechanics

Join the Conversation for National Heatstroke Prevention Day 2015

Tomorrow, July 31st, marks NHTSA’s annual National Heatstroke Prevention Day, designed to bring awareness to this issue and share simple prevention tips with families. Unfortunately, an average of 37 children have died from heatstroke since 1998, the majority of which are accidentally left behind in a hot vehicle by a caregiver. Although this remains a complex topic, recent technological advancements represent an important step forward in finding a vehicle-based solution to avoiding these preventable tragedies.

Student Engineers Get the Spotlight at Injury Biomechanics Symposium

Today, we are pleased to welcome a guest blog post from John Bolte, PhD, Director of the Injury Biomechanics Research Center at The Ohio State University (OSU). John discusses the Injury Biomechanics Symposium, where OSU hosts students from universities around the world to present their research.

Research Goes Beyond the Crash Test Dummy with Kinect Sensors

Current testing protocols for evaluation of child restraint systems (CRS) do not always reflect real-world scenarios. CIRP@CHOP and Monash University researchers conducted a large-scale naturalistic study of children restrained in CRS that vehicles instrumented with Microsoft Xbox Kinect Sensors™. One million Kinect images later, we know more about realistic child movements in their CRS.

Using the Microsoft Xbox Kinect Sensor™ for Child Safety Research

It is no surprise that researchers often seek out cost-effective ways to conduct rigorous research. What may be surprising, however, is that a new data collection tool being utilized by CIRP@CHOP investigators is part of a gaming system that many families have in their homes.

Active Safety in Motor Vehicles: Considering the Implications for Child Occupants and Teen Drivers

As active safety features (safety systems that are active prior to a crash, such as seat belts or air bags) become more complex in motor vehicles, it's critical for child safety researchers to consider the implications for child and adolescent motor vehicle occupants and teen drivers.

An International Collaboration For Child Passenger Safety

Today, we are pleased to share a moderated discussion between Kristy Arbogast, PhD, CIRP@CHOP co-scientific director, and Isabelle Stockman, a researcher and PhD candidate from SAFER, the Vehicle and Traffic Safety Center at Chalmers University of Technology in Gothenburg, Sweden. Dr. Arbogast and Ms. Stockman have collaborated on several projects looking at the impact of pre-crash maneuvers on child passenger safety.

50 Years Later: The Rear-facing Child Seat

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the rear-facing child safety seat, a pivotal innovation in the field of child occupant protection. While there have been impressive strides made in child passenger safety in the US and abroad over the past few decades, there is still work to be done to ensure all children are optimally protected in motor vehicle crashes.

Children in Hot Cars: No Single Solution to These Preventable Tragedies

This blog explores how a multi-faceted approach is needed to reduce the prevalence of pediatric heat stroke. A combination of education, awareness, and technology can help families avoid these preventable tragedies.

The Infinite Possibilities of Finite Element Modeling

CIRP training in motion: Using Finite Element Modeling to Reduce Car Crash Injuries

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