Child Passenger Safety

New Resource Alert: Webinar on Safety in Children with Special Health Care Needs

Patty Huang recently presented a webinar on safety in children with special health care needs (CHSCN), hosted by the Wisconsin Department of Health Services' Injury and Violence Prevention and CYSHCN Programs. In it, she describes key factors that place CSHCN at risk for unintentional injuries, and reviews strategies for injury prevention that families of CHSCN should know. Here are some links to access the presentation.

Active Safety in Motor Vehicles: Considering the Implications for Child Occupants and Teen Drivers

As active safety features (safety systems that are active prior to a crash, such as seat belts or air bags) become more complex in motor vehicles, it's critical for child safety researchers to consider the implications for child and adolescent motor vehicle occupants and teen drivers.

Wandering in Kids with Autism Spectrum Disorders

Elopement, or wandering, is the most common "problematic" behavior related to safety that I encounter in my practice and can potentially lead to pedestrian traffic injuries. Learn what clinicians, schools, and parents can do.

Expanding Child Passenger Safety Knowledge in China

I recently returned from an exciting conference in Shanghai, China– the 1st International Conference on Children’s Car Safety Technology. I was fortunate to be a member of a multinational coalition of researchers and industry experts whose goal was to jump-start activities in Shanghai regarding support of a recently passed law requiring child restraints for young children.

An International Collaboration For Child Passenger Safety

Today, we are pleased to share a moderated discussion between Kristy Arbogast, PhD, CIRP@CHOP co-scientific director, and Isabelle Stockman, a researcher and PhD candidate from SAFER, the Vehicle and Traffic Safety Center at Chalmers University of Technology in Gothenburg, Sweden. Dr. Arbogast and Ms. Stockman have collaborated on several projects looking at the impact of pre-crash maneuvers on child passenger safety.

The Role of the Pediatrician in Child Passenger Safety

Recent CHOP research published in The Journal of Pediatrics explores the awareness, attitudes, and dissemination practices of pediatricians two years following the release of the revised policy statement on child passenger safety from the American Academy of Pediatrics.

50 Years Later: The Rear-facing Child Seat

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the rear-facing child safety seat, a pivotal innovation in the field of child occupant protection. While there have been impressive strides made in child passenger safety in the US and abroad over the past few decades, there is still work to be done to ensure all children are optimally protected in motor vehicle crashes.

Teens and Distracted Walking

Our team came across this great infographic from Safe Kids about pedestrian safety -- “How Does a Teenager Cross the Road?”. Based on over 34,000 observations and discussion groups with more than 2,400 students during the 2012-2013 school year, their research indicates that a significant number of high school and middle school students cross the street while distracted, most frequently texting or using headphones. Although older teens account for half of all pedestrian deaths among children age 19 or younger, only one-fifth of teens felt that their age group was the most at risk for pedestrian injuries. To understand these findings, it is helpful to review brain development during adolescence and how teens make decisions.

Updated CPS Police Tip Cards

In time for Child Passenger Safety Week, the Child Restraint Basics Tip Card has been updated to reflect current AAP recommendations. This pocket-sized tip card has just the basics about CPS-- with room for you to customize it with your state's traffic code.

Airplane Safety Restraint for Kids with Special Needs

What if my patient doesn't need an adaptive car seat but has behavioral challenges and the parents feel that the traditional airplane seat belt may not be effective enough to keep him restrained? The CARES restraint is approved for airplane use for children 22-40 lbs and up to 40 inches tall. If a child exceeds the weight limit but the parents feel that this is still a better option for restraint, they can apply for an exemption from the FAA.

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