Violence Prevention

Suicide on College Campuses: A Call for a Culture Change

Suicide continues to be a leading cause of death among children and young adults, and recently released statistics from the CDC report an overall increase of suicide rates by 24 percent over a recent 15 year span. There is a need to change the culture on how we deal with suicidality at universities, including de-stigmatizing the issue and increasing access to mental health services.

CHOP and Lutheran Settlement House: How an Academic-Community Partnership Can Prevent Intimate Partner Violence

At CHOP, we partner with Lutheran Settlement House through the Children’s and Mom’s Project (CAMP) to provide on-site support and resources for caregivers and patients experiencing violence from intimate or romantic partners. I am excited to share my recent conversation with Lutheran Settlement House's Marcella Slick to discuss CAMP’s recent successes and what’s on the horizon for this rapidly-growing program.

Why Pediatricians Should Ask About Bullying

When it comes to bullying, there are multiple touchpoints at which intervention is possible, including at schools, at home, and through visits to the pediatrician’s office. Here at CHOP, we have instituted a network-wide bullying screen as part of our Electronic Health Record, making asking about bullying a standard part of the care that many of our patients receive.

A Pediatrician’s Guide to Understand and Support Youth with Gender Dysphoria

As a developmental and behavioral pediatrician, I sometimes face questions such as, “My 5-year-old son much more strongly prefers ‘girl’ toys, like dolls and princesses. What does this mean?” I’m sure many other clinicians also face the same types of questions from time to time. How can we help parents to understand whether these symptoms are part of common exploration, or whether it is a sign of something else?

Speak Up and Screen: A Reaction to Recent Suicide Clusters

In the wake of another suicide cluster in California, learn what we can do to prevent these tragedies from occurring.

The Evolution of Teen Dating Violence Research: Understanding the Complexity of Gender Roles

This post explores how teen dating violence research has expanded and diversified, particularly around gender differences. While partner violence first gained recognition as a women’s issue, more recent research sheds light on the nuances around victimization and perpetration rates across genders for various forms of violence.

Health Policy to Address Teen Dating Violence

Teen dating violence, defined by as physical, sexual, psychological, or emotional violence within a dating relationship, including stalking, is unfortunately pervasive, as approximately 1 in 3 teens in the United States report being a victim of physical, sexual, emotional or verbal abuse from a dating partner in the past 12 months. Research in the field of teen dating violence has progressed and diversified in recent years, but it’s important to consider how this work has impacted health policy.

Making a Career of Preventing Youth Violence

In this guest blog post, Amanda Parks, a former CIRP@CHOP REU student, shares her experiences working with the Violence Prevention Initiative.

School-based Intervention Can Help Stop “Mean Girls” Tendencies

A recently published study has established CHOP’s Friend to Friend as the first and only relational aggression intervention to demonstrate a decrease in relationally-aggressive behaviors among urban minority girls that continued at least a year after the conclusion of the program.

Glen's Village

I recently learned about the amazing film “Glen’s Village” featuring the journey of one of my former patients, Glen Casey. His trajectory to becoming a student at The University of Pennsylvania, including the impact of childhood trauma, was the subject of a documentary produced by the Philadelphia Public School Notebook. Read more to learn about the film.

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