Center for Injury Research and Prevention

Impact of the Young Adult Dependent Coverage Expansion on Opioid Overdoses and Deaths: a Quasi-Experimental Study

TitleImpact of the Young Adult Dependent Coverage Expansion on Opioid Overdoses and Deaths: a Quasi-Experimental Study
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2020
AuthorsCoupet E, Werner RM, Polsky D, Karp D, Delgado KM
JournalJ Gen Intern Med
Date Published01/2020
ISSN1525-1497
Keywordshealth policy; opioids; substance use
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Several policymakers have suggested that the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has fueled the opioid epidemic by subsidizing opioid pain medications. These claims have supported numerous efforts to repeal the ACA.

OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of the ACA's young adult dependent coverage insurance expansion on emergency department (ED) encounters and out-of-hospital deaths from opioid overdose.

DESIGN: Difference-in-differences analyses comparing ED encounters and out-of-hospital deaths before (2009) and after (2011-2013) the ACA young adult dependent coverage expansion. We further stratified by prescription opioid, non-prescription opioid, and methadone overdoses.

PARTICIPANTS: Adults aged 23-25 years old and 27-29 years old who presented to the ED or died prior to reaching the hospital from opioid overdose.

MAIN MEASURES: Rate of ED encounters and deaths for opioid overdose per 100,000 U.S. adults.

KEY RESULTS: There were 108,253 ED encounters from opioid overdose in total. The expansion was not associated with a significant change in the ED encounter rates for opioid overdoses of all types (2.04 per 100,000 adults [95% CI - 0.75 to 4.82]), prescription opioids (0.60 per 100,000 adults [95% CI - 1.98 to 0.77]), or methadone (0.29 per 100,000 adults [95% CI - 0.78 to 0.21]). There was a slight increase in the rate of non-prescription opioid overdoses (1.91 per 100,000 adults [95% CI 0.13-3.71]). The expansion was not associated with a significant change in the out-of-hospital mortality rates for opioid overdoses of all types (0.49 per 100,000 adults [95% CI - 0.80 to 1.78]).

CONCLUSIONS: Our findings do not support claims that the ACA has fueled the prescription opioid epidemic. However, the expansion was associated with an increase in the rate of ED encounters for non-prescription opioid overdoses such as heroin, although almost all were non-fatal. Future research is warranted to understand the role of private insurance in providing access to treatment in this population.

DOI10.1007/s11606-019-05605-3
Alternate JournalJ Gen Intern Med
PubMed ID31898130
Grant ListK12DA033312 / DA / NIDA NIH HHS / United States
T32HL098054 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
K23HD090272001 / / National Institute of Child Health and Human Development /