Center for Injury Research and Prevention

Objective Eye Tracking Deficits Following Concussion for Youth Seen in a Sports Medicine Setting.

TitleObjective Eye Tracking Deficits Following Concussion for Youth Seen in a Sports Medicine Setting.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsHowell DR, Brilliant AN, Storey EP, Podolak O, Meehan WP, Master CL
JournalJ Child Neurol
Pagination883073818789320
Date Published2018 Aug 08
ISSN1708-8283
Abstract

Quantification of visual deficits may help to identify dysfunction following concussion. We evaluated eye-tracking measurements among adolescents within 10 days of concussion and healthy control participants. Patients who reported to 2 tertiary care sport concussion clinics within 10 days of concussion completed an objective eye tracking assessment. Seventy-nine participants completed the study, 44 with concussion (mean age = 14.1 ± 2.2 years, 39% female) and 35 controls (mean age = 14.3 ± 2.4 years, 57% female). Right eye skew along the bottom of the screen was significantly higher for the concussion group compared to controls (median = 0.022 [interquartile range = -0.263, 0.482] vs 0.377 [interquartile range = -0.574, -0.031]; P = .002), but not the left eye. Among the variables investigated, right eye skew was altered for adolescents with a concussion. Visual function is an important component in the postconcussion evaluation, and identifying deficits soon after injury may allow for earlier specialist referral and intervention.

DOI10.1177/0883073818789320
Alternate JournalJ. Child Neurol.
PubMed ID30088436