Center for Injury Research and Prevention

Perspectives of hospital emergency department staff on trauma-informed care for injured children: An Australian and New Zealand analysis.

TitlePerspectives of hospital emergency department staff on trauma-informed care for injured children: An Australian and New Zealand analysis.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsHoysted C, Babl FE, Kassam-Adams N, Landolt MA, Jobson L, Curtis S, Kharbanda AB, Lyttle MD, Parri N, Stanley R, Alisic E
JournalJ Paediatr Child Health
Volume53
Issue9
Pagination862-869
Date Published2017 Sep
ISSN1440-1754
Abstract

AIM: To examine Australian and New Zealand emergency department (ED) staff's training, knowledge and confidence regarding trauma-informed care for children after trauma, and barriers to implementation.

METHODS: ED staff's perspectives on trauma-informed care were assessed using a web-based self-report questionnaire. Participants included 468 ED staff (375 nursing and 111 medical staff) from hospitals in Australia and New Zealand. Data analyses included descriptive statistics, χtests and multiple regressions.

RESULTS: Over 90% of respondents had not received training in trauma-informed care and almost all respondents (94%) wanted training in this area. While knowledge was associated with a respondent's previous training and profession, confidence was associated with the respondent's previous training, experience level and workplace. Dominant barriers to the implementation of trauma-informed care were lack of time and lack of training.

CONCLUSIONS: There is a need and desire for training and education of Australian and New Zealand ED staff in trauma-informed care. This study demonstrates that experience alone is not sufficient for the development of knowledge of paediatric traumatic stress reactions and trauma-informed care practices. Existing education materials could be adapted for use in the ED and to accommodate the training preferences of Australian and New Zealand ED staff.

DOI10.1111/jpc.13644
Alternate JournalJ Paediatr Child Health
PubMed ID28782226