Center for Injury Research and Prevention

Modeling spatial trajectories in dynamics testing using basis splines: application to tracking human volunteers in low-speed frontal impacts.

TitleModeling spatial trajectories in dynamics testing using basis splines: application to tracking human volunteers in low-speed frontal impacts.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsSamuels MA, Reed MP, Arbogast KB, Seacrist T
JournalComput Methods Biomech Biomed Engin
Volume19
Issue10
Pagination1046-52
Date Published01/2016
ISSN1476-8259
KeywordsAccidents, Traffic, Adolescent, Adult, Anthropometry, Biomechanical Phenomena, Child, Female, Healthy Volunteers, Humans, Male, Models, Theoretical, Principal Component Analysis, Young Adult
Abstract

Designing motor vehicle safety systems requires knowledge of whole body kinematics during dynamic loading for occupants of varying size and age, often obtained from sled tests with postmortem human subjects and human volunteers. Recently, we reported pediatric and adult responses in low-speed (<4 g) automotive-like impacts, noting reductions in maximum excursion with increasing age. Since the time-based trajectory shape is also relevant for restraint design, this study quantified the time-series trajectories using basis splines and developed a statistical model for predicting trajectories as a function of body dimension or age. Previously collected trajectories of the head, spine, and pelvis were modeled using cubic basis splines with eight control points. A principal component analysis was conducted on the control points and related to erect seated height using a linear regression model. The resulting statistical model quantified how trajectories became shorter and flatter with increasing body size, corresponding to the validation data-set. Trajectories were then predicted for erect seated heights corresponding to pediatric and adult anthropomorphic test devices (ATDs), thus generating performance criteria for the ATDs based on human response. This statistical model can be used to predict trajectories for a subject of specified anthropometry and utilized in subject-specific computational models of occupant response.

DOI10.1080/10255842.2015.1091886
Alternate JournalComput Methods Biomech Biomed Engin
PubMed ID26428257