Violence Prevention Initiative

Our Most Popular Posts 2016

December 28, 2016
As 2016 draws to a close, let's take a look back at Research in Action's most popular posts in the last year.

Decreasing "Mean Girl" Aggression Associated With Better Behavior Across Classroom

June 13, 2016
CHOP's Friend to Friend program has been proven effective for reducing the relational aggression of urban African-American 3rd to 5th grade girls. New research shows that the positive impact of the program extends to the entire classroom, including male students, non-aggressive female students, and even teachers, by channeling the influence of aggressive girls in a positive way and allowing them opportunities to hone their leadership skills.

National Gun Violence Awareness Day, June 2nd

May 24, 2016
Next Thursday, June 2nd, National Gun Violence Awareness Day will be marked with events around the country. Among children and youth aged 1-24 years, guns cause two times as many deaths as cancer, five times as many as heart disease, and 20 times as many as infections. CHOP's Violence Prevention Initiative is dedicated to bringing a trauma-informed approach to violence prevention intervention at multiple touchpoints in a child’s lifespan, including an Emergency Department-based program which provides direct services to patients who are treated for assault injuries.

CHOP and Lutheran Settlement House: How an Academic-Community Partnership Can Prevent Intimate Partner Violence

May 5, 2016

At CHOP, we partner with Lutheran Settlement House through the Children’s and Mom’s Project (CAMP) to provide on-site support and resources for caregivers and patients experiencing violence from intimate or romantic partners. I am excited to share my recent conversation with Lutheran Settlement House's Marcella Slick to discuss CAMP’s recent successes and what’s on the horizon for this rapidly-growing program.

A Pediatrician’s Guide to Understand and Support Youth with Gender Dysphoria

March 28, 2016
As a developmental and behavioral pediatrician, I sometimes face questions such as, “My 5-year-old son much more strongly prefers ‘girl’ toys, like dolls and princesses. What does this mean?” I’m sure many other clinicians also face the same types of questions from time to time. How can we help parents to understand whether these symptoms are part of common exploration, or whether it is a sign of something else?

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