Center for Injury Research and Prevention

teen brain

Working Memory Development and Teen Crashes

September 17, 2019
Read about a new study conducted by researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the Annenberg Public Policy Center that explores the role of working memory development in adolescents and motor vehicle crash risk.

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Beyond Legislation to Curb Texting While Driving

July 10, 2018
It remains unclear if distracted driving legislation has had much success in reducing the problem. New research indicates that teens who report texting and taking calls while driving also engage in other intentionally risky driving behaviors, such as ignoring speed limits.

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Can Loud Music Affect Driving Performance?

April 16, 2018
A curious exchange on Twitter recently occurred after singer Zara Larsson tweeted of her mother’s complaint that she “can’t see” while driving if the in-car music is too loud. Could this be a real phenomenon? Here's what we know based on the science.

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Teens and Distracted Walking

September 11, 2014
Our team came across this great infographic from Safe Kids about pedestrian safety -- “How Does a Teenager Cross the Road?”. Based on over 34,000 observations and discussion groups with more than 2,400 students during the 2012-2013 school year, their research indicates that a significant number of high school and middle school students cross the street while distracted, most frequently texting or using headphones. Although older teens account for half of all pedestrian deaths among children age 19 or younger, only one-fifth of teens felt that their age group was the most at risk for pedestrian injuries. To understand these findings, it is helpful to review brain development during adolescence and how teens make decisions.

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Can You Train the Teen Brain to Drive?

June 27, 2013
CIRP@CHOP recently welcomed Robert Isler, PhD, an associate professor of Psychology at The University of Waikato in New Zealand, for an extended visit. He has spent over the past two decades researching physiological psychology and human performance, road safety, and driver training and education to help prevent teen driver crashes. Dr. Isler created eDrive, an engaging gaming platform to train teens on higher order driving skills (i.e., visual search, situation awareness, hazard perception, insight training, and risk management). Results are so promising that the New Zealand government now offers it for free to all learner teen drivers.

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