concussion diagnosis and management

Acceptable Concussion Risk in Professional vs. Youth Athletes

August 4, 2015
Probably along with many of you, our household cheered when the United States won the Women’s World Cup championship last month. Amidst the excitement for the win, however, one moment in the tournament stands out for me- a controversial decision in the USA vs. Germany game to allow two players back into the match following a head to head collision. Regardless of whether that was the correct call, I think it’s important to recognize that when it comes to concussion risk, coaches and clinicians should take a more conservative approach for youth athletes.

Concussion's Vestibular Deficits Are Common, May Predict Slower Recovery

April 30, 2015
In a recent journal article, CHOP researchers describe the prevalence of vestibular deficits in pediatric concussion patients and what recovery looks like for patients that exhibit them at initial evaluation. The vestibular system in the brain and inner ear helps us visually track and focus, maintaining our balance. It's your body's "steadycam", which we can use to help diagnose concussion and then help patients recover from these deficits.

Characteristics of Prolonged Concussion Recovery for Children

December 9, 2014
I recently co-authored a research article in the Journal of Pediatrics that identified pre-existing characteristics associated with prolonged recovery from concussions for children and youth (ages 5-18 years). Readers can use these data to further study risk factors for prolonged recovery, and to help with decision-making and care planning for concussion patients.

Concussion Diagnoses in the ED: Ensuring symptoms are not overlooked

September 23, 2014
In a patient with direct trauma to the head and who presents with clear symptoms, the diagnosis of concussion is generally straightforward. However, it can be much more challenging to diagnose a subtle concussion, particularly among patients with multiple injuries or non-direct head trauma.

Empirical Evidence Supports Cognitive Rest After Concussion

January 6, 2014
Published this week, a study in Pediatrics provides evidence for cognitive rest as an effective strategy following a concussion. Naomi Brown, MD, a Sports Medicine specialist at CHOP, found that study participants with the highest levels of activity suffered longer duration of symptoms than those with lower levels of cognitive activity. Kristy Arbogast, PhD speaks with Dr. Brown about the research questions that would help clinicians, as well as a new assessment tool called the Cognitive Activity Scale.


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