Research in Action Blog

The world of child injury prevention advances quickly in big and small steps each day. The Research in Action blog shares credible and timely commentary on the latest news, research, events, and more as we work together to keep children safe. We invite thought-provoking comments to spur friendly conversation among our readers. We feel that the regular posting of well-informed commentary by our readers will only enhance the quality of our blog. Comments are moderated by the Research in Action blog staff. The comments section is not intended to be a forum for specific parenting advice or to promote a product. Please use the "Contact Us" form for any information requests. Read more about our Commenting Guidelines.

The Challenges of Child Seat Installations

Child restraint system (CRS) misuse is a common occurrence that remains a challenge for the child passenger safety community and caregivers. Particularly alarming is that, although recent estimates of CRS misuse are as high as 72 percent, other research has found that 90 percent of caregivers are confident or very confident in their installation of a CRS. In research published in Injury Prevention this month, my CIRP@CHOP colleagues and I investigated caregivers’ confidence in CRS installations with interesting results.

A Perfect Storm

There is convincing evidence that individuals with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are at heightened risk for unsafe driving behaviors, including teens. Despite a “perfect storm” of inexperience, adolescence and ADHD that increases crash risk, only emerging research about potential interventions exists for these teens. This can be frustrating for both parents and clinicians, like myself, who frequently discuss the risk of driving with teens with ADHD but have little information to offer about specific ways to keep them safe. In an editorial published today in JAMA Pediatrics, my CIRP@CHOP colleagues Flaura Winston and Catherine McDonald address this need head-on.

Coming to Terms with Trauma

Something we focus on in our Post-injury Care and Recovery research at CIRP@CHOP is the difference between everyday stressors and more serious traumatic stress reactions that can lead to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This difference is uniquely explored in a recent New York Times article by psychiatrist and author Mark Epstein entitled, “The Trauma of Being Alive."

Assessing Your Teen’s Readiness to Drive

I recently heard Pam Fisher from the NJ Teen Safe Driving Coalition on Radio Times discuss, among other things, texting and driving among teens, the importance of practice, and following Graduated Driver Licensing (GDL) to enhance teen driving safety. This made me think about other conversations I've had regarding readiness to drive among teens in general. It can be easy to forget that teens who appear physically ready to drive may not be mentally ready to drive. We’ve created some questions that can help to guide a discussion between parents and pediatricians regarding driving readiness.

A Rare Look Into a Rare Event- School Bus Crash Investigation

School bus transportation remains the safest form of ground transportation in the US. Because injuries and fatalities involving school bus crashes are rare, when they do happen, it’s all the more important to understand the mechanisms of injury to child passengers. Recently my CIRP@CHOP colleague Kristy Arbogast, PhD and I were presented with a unique opportunity by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) to assist with an investigation into a fatal 2012 school bus crash in Port St. Lucie, FL.

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