Research in Action Blog

The world of child injury prevention advances quickly in big and small steps each day. The Research in Action blog shares credible and timely commentary on the latest news, research, events, and more as we work together to keep children safe. We invite thought-provoking comments to spur friendly conversation among our readers. We feel that the regular posting of well-informed commentary by our readers will only enhance the quality of our blog. Comments are moderated by the Research in Action blog staff. The comments section is not intended to be a forum for specific parenting advice or to promote a product. Please use the "Contact Us" form for any information requests. Read more about our Commenting Guidelines.

Upcoming Twitter Chat on Sports-Related #KidsConcussions

CIRP@CHOP's Mark Zonfrillo, MD, MSCE (@safetymd) will be an expert participant in an upcoming Twitter Chat on sports-related head injuries in children. The chat will cover a wide variety of topics including the latest concussion research, advocacy, education about how to protect young athletes, signs and symptoms of concussions, and treatment options.

National Teen Driver Safety Week – 11 Days & Counting

I belong to an important network of educators, community leaders, parents, teens, and organizations, both large and small. Our mission? To reduce teen driver crashes, the #1 cause of death for this age group. We are now gearing up for National Teen Driver Safety Week -- now in its 7th year and only 11 days away – and the momentum is building.

The Biomechanics Behind Child Passenger Safety

If you are a Research in Action reader in the field of child passenger safety, you know the safest ways to properly restrain a child in a motor vehicle and may even work to educate parents on this topic. What may be less obvious, however, is the complex body of biomechanical engineering research behind the current best practice recommendations.

Where to Start for Teen Drivers? With Parents

At CIRP@CHOP, we explore the behavioral aspects of strengthening this bond between parents and teens. From teens, we frequently hear that they take cues from their parents for what is appropriate driving behavior. Likewise, parents express concerns about not knowing where to start to help their teens become safe skilled drivers. In support of the theme for National Teen Driver Safety Week (October 20-26) -- It Takes Two: Shared Expectations for Teens and Parents for Driving -- I want to share practical tips for parents on modeling safe driving behaviors as a place to start to help their teens:

Make the Most of GDL's Learner Phase

As a developmental psychologist, I am thrilled that this year’s theme for National Teen Driver Safety Week (October 20-26) is It Takes Two: Shared Expectations for Teens and Parents for Driving. This theme emphasizes that research and practice efforts should consider the family unit as opposed to focusing on parents and teens in isolation.

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