Center for Injury Research and Prevention

Violence Prevention

In Bullying Prevention, Singling Out the Victim Isn’t the Answer

Learn how employing a whole-school approach to bullying prevention, rather than singling out the bully or the victim, can lead to a culture of acceptance and empowerment.

Try One Kind Word

All of us have been there. You are in a hospital reception area, riding public transit, or some other public gathering space. You see a parent telling a young child they are stupid or to shut up or is yanking their arm forcefully. It’s not rising to the level of “child abuse” for reporting purposes, but in your heart you know that those small, daily acts of violence can add up and have a real impact on that child’s development and well-being. You want to intervene for that child but you don’t know how or what would be helpful. Read how one kind word or gesture could help defuse the situation.

Providing a Unique Forum for Community-based Participatory Research

Events that bring community organizations and academic institutions together embody the tenet of community-based participatory research. One such event is Community-driven Research Day, which was hosted at CHOP in January.

The Knockout Game Is No Myth

I recently co-authored a letter that was published in the Lancet with my colleague, Joel Fein, MD, who directs the Violence Intervention Program in the Emergency Department at CHOP, to help raise awareness of a dangerous trend.

Creating a Positive School Climate: CHOP’s Bullying Prevention Program

Since September, a CHOP team composed of researchers and educational facilitators have been working with fourth grade students and their teachers at Philadelphia's Childs Elementary School through the classroom-based Preventing Relational Aggression in Schools Everyday (PRAISE) Program. PRAISE is one component of CHOP’s Partner for Prevention (P4P) program, a school-based bullying prevention program designed to help at-risk 3rd-5th grade students learn to recognize and control their anger while promoting friendship-making skills.

Child Injury Prevention Holiday Wish List

In the spirit of my previous Thanksgiving post about items for which I’m grateful in the pediatric injury world, I thought I’d make my holiday “wish list” for the next year and beyond.

Gun Violence and Children - Bold Action is Imperative

Last year at this time we were enjoying the holiday season unaware of the tragedy about to unfold in Newtown, Connecticut at the Sandy Hook Elementary School. When it happened, it shook us to our core – 20 children along with 6 adults killed in a matter of minutes by a single gunman. In reaction to the emotion CHOP employees felt after Sandy Hook, our CEO, Steve M. Altschuler, MD, commented that, “We cannot let a sense of hopelessness overcome our ability to truly make a difference in an individual child’s life.” For this to stop, for children to stop being injured and killed by gunshot, bold action and change is imperative.

English Channel Swim Benefits Violence Prevention Research

21 miles in 11 hours 28 minutes! That’s how long it took Ika Kovacikova to swim the English Channel in Mid-August to benefit CHOP’s Violence Intervention Program (VIP). As a 2012 alumna of CIRP’s Injury Science Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program supported by the National Science Foundation, Ika knew VIP was a cause that would inspire her to complete the crossing. Ika raised $600 (and still counting!) as her way of giving back to CIRP@CHOP and VIP.

Repair the World or Stop It From Breaking?

The three-year old boy had a low grade fever and runny nose. Mom was sleeping in the corner of the room when I came in and barely awakened when I knocked on the door. Our conversation was short and to the point as I went through my routine “it’s a virus, tincture of time” talk. Leaving the room, the mom asked me for a taxi voucher. She did not want to call Freddie’s father for a ride back. With one more question, easily skipped, I learned that she and the child’s father had been fighting about their son’s cough keeping him awake. Freddie’s father had kicked them out of the house to find a doctor to “fix him or I will fix him, and you.” Turns out that Freddie and his mom were living in a house of fear and uncertainty. We see kids like Freddie each day. Sometimes we can sense that something is off but are afraid to ask that next question. Oftentimes, we cannot see the problem until we ask the right questions. Emergency medical providers may not feel that learning about these issues is their role. The first part of addressing a “chronic illness” is recognizing it. The next time you get “that feeling” see what a few straightforward, respectful questions can reveal.

Swimming the English Channel for CIRP

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to swim the English Channel? Imagine swimming 21 miles in 57-degree water with no wet suit, while negotiating tides in one of the busiest shipping lanes in the world. Well, Ika Kovacikova, one of our 2012 Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) participants, is taking on the challenge and dedicating proceeds from her English Channel swim to CHOP's Violence Intervention Program.

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