Center for Injury Research and Prevention

Pedestrian Safety

Where Do Child Pedestrians Look Before Crossing the Street?

Learn about a one-of-a-kind pilot study that employed a virtual pedestrian crossing environment to explore how eye-tracking technology could be used to evaluate children’s behavior and point of view before crossing.

#InMyFeelings -- The Latest Dangerous Fad

As summer draws to a close, we reflect on the dangerous fad of the season: the #InMyFeelings challenge.

Vision Zero Initiative and the Bumpy Road to Self-Driving Cars

Just like black boxes have helped the aeronautical industry fine-tune hardware and software and to install redundancy to maximize air traffic safety, one can hope the new self-driving technology will help us decrease the number of deaths on the road and reach the Vision Zero objective we are all striving to achieve.

Parking Lot Distractions

In this post, we discuss the findings of a recent National Safety Council poll on driving behaviors in parking lots.

Remembering Pedestrian and Bicyclist Safety

While we often link road safety to vehicle safety, more children sustain injuries as pedestrians and bicyclists than as occupants in motor vehicle crashes. As pediatricians, we need to be proactive about teaching “defensive” walking and biking. Read more for discussion tips with with parents.

Wandering in Kids with Autism Spectrum Disorders

Elopement, or wandering, is the most common "problematic" behavior related to safety that I encounter in my practice and can potentially lead to pedestrian traffic injuries. Learn what clinicians, schools, and parents can do.

Autumn Safety

Pumpkins, Halloween, apple cider...fall is filled with fun foods and events. But between sun glare for drivers, fallen leaves covering the road, seasonal festivals, and Halloween, we need to be reminded of how to adjust our own safety awareness to the season.

Teens and Distracted Walking

Our team came across this great infographic from Safe Kids about pedestrian safety -- “How Does a Teenager Cross the Road?”. Based on over 34,000 observations and discussion groups with more than 2,400 students during the 2012-2013 school year, their research indicates that a significant number of high school and middle school students cross the street while distracted, most frequently texting or using headphones. Although older teens account for half of all pedestrian deaths among children age 19 or younger, only one-fifth of teens felt that their age group was the most at risk for pedestrian injuries. To understand these findings, it is helpful to review brain development during adolescence and how teens make decisions.

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