Center for Injury Research and Prevention

Injury Recovery

What Nurses Know About Trauma-informed Care

Nurses play a key role in children’s physical and psychological recovery from injury. We are often the first to recognize and respond to the emotional impact of injury on families. A new study published in the Journal of Pediatric Nursing provides the first systematic look at what nurses think and do with regard to trauma-informed care for children.

Pediatric Concussion Study: Current Recommendations for Rest Are Still Best

While a new study in Pediatrics confirms current best practice, media headlines might confuse families and healthcare providers. Here are messages to reaffirm.

Characteristics of Prolonged Concussion Recovery for Children

I recently co-authored a research article in the Journal of Pediatrics that identified pre-existing characteristics associated with prolonged recovery from concussions for children and youth (ages 5-18 years). Readers can use these data to further study risk factors for prolonged recovery, and to help with decision-making and care planning for concussion patients.

Consider This Framework for Treating PTS in Children After Acute Medical Trauma

Working at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, I have been impressed by our medical teams’ efforts to support children and families by paying attention to both their physical treatment and recovery, as well as their emotional recovery. In assessing our patients for medical treatment, many questions need to be answered for our team to help promote optimal recovery and to minimize negative emotional reactions such as posttraumatic stress. We recently developed a new model to help organize our thought processes and questions around recovery from medical events and to fuel future research in understanding factors that are associated with child outcomes.

Join CIRP for a Twitter Chat on Head Injuries in Children

CIRP@CHOP's Kristy Arbogast, PhD and Mark Zonfrillo, MD, MSCE will be expert participants in a December 2nd Twitter Chat on sports-related head injuries in children, tweeting under the handle @safetymd. The chat will cover the latest concussion research, advocacy efforts, education about protecting young athletes, signs and symptoms of concussions, and treatment options.

New Resource Alert: After The Injury or Illness Tipsheets for Siblings in English and Spanish

To help families cope after a sibling has been injured, the Center for Pediatric Traumatic Stress (CPTS) has created evidence-based tipsheets in both English and Spanish. These helpful resources were developed based on recommendations from the CPTS Family Advisory Board.

Concussion Diagnoses in the ED: Ensuring symptoms are not overlooked

In a patient with direct trauma to the head and who presents with clear symptoms, the diagnosis of concussion is generally straightforward. However, it can be much more challenging to diagnose a subtle concussion, particularly among patients with multiple injuries or non-direct head trauma.

Early Intervention After Child Trauma: Do We Know What Works?

When traumatic events affect children we all want to help. In the aftermath of large-scale tragedies, communities are often deluged with donations and offers of assistance, not all of them useful. How to help in a way that is useful and supportive of children’s natural recovery processes is a pressing issue in the field of traumatic stress. Dr. Kassam-Adams proposes a guide to researchers and practitioners to meet the challenge.

Parent Injury Can Cause Stress for a Child

Nearly two decades ago our team was planning a follow-up study with parents of injured children treated in the Emergency Department. In the very first phone interview for the study, I spoke with the mother of a teenager injured in a traffic crash. She was very happy to answer our questions about her son’s recovery but quickly added, “You should be asking about me! My son is doing well now. I am a mess.” She went on to describe feeling worried and afraid every time her son left the house, even though she knew he was not in real danger. This mother’s voice was crucial. She reminded us of the importance of asking about a parent’s own responses to a child’s injury. But what happens to the child when it is the parent who is injured?

New Resource Alert: Child Injury Recovery Resources in Spanish

Last week Nancy Kassam-Adams, PhD blogged about the need for Spanish-language resources for patients and families. CIRP worked closely with the Center for Pediatric Traumatic Stress at CHOP and the Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children to develop resources to fill this gap.

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