Child, Parenting, and Healthcare Provider Issues

Digital Health Initiative Webinar on Engaging Patients in Informatics

Learn about how you can take part in a webinar on patient engagement to develop and evaluate consumer informatics led by Linda Fleisher, PhD, MPH, director of CIRP's Digital Health Initiative. The webinar will take place on May 22.

For Healthcare Providers, Healing Doesn’t End With the Patient

Traumatic stress in healthcare providers may seem like "part of the job," but it can have a profound impact on their professional and personal lives. This post provides actionable steps for healthcare providers to manage their own traumatic stress reactions in the clinical setting.

Toward A Better Understanding of Teen Driver Crashes

In an editorial published today in JAMA Pediatrics, I commend the work being done by my teen driver safety colleagues at Virginia Tech as part of the Naturalistic Teen Driving Study. The study by Ouimet et al.¹ examines the association between cortisol reactivity and crashes and near-crashes among newly-licensed teens. While these findings do present an interesting new line of research, they do not suggest that we are close to developing a clinically useful biomarker-based diagnostic test nor a pharmaceutical therapy to reduce the risk for teen driver crashes. Continued research is needed.

Why Preventing Pediatric Injury Death Is Only Part of the Puzzle

In a letter published today in the Australian & New Zealand Journal of Public Health, I commend the work being done by my pediatric injury prevention research colleagues in New Zealand to help reduce child injury mortality in their country. They developed injury prevention recommendations that were published late last year in the Australian & New Zealand Journal of Public Health using a well-developed European Child Safety Report Card model as a metric for comparison. However, I believe that it is important to further adapt these Report Card metrics and also measure reduction in non-fatal morbidity from injuries in children.

Try One Kind Word

All of us have been there. You are in a hospital reception area, riding public transit, or some other public gathering space. You see a parent telling a young child they are stupid or to shut up or is yanking their arm forcefully. It’s not rising to the level of “child abuse” for reporting purposes, but in your heart you know that those small, daily acts of violence can add up and have a real impact on that child’s development and well-being. You want to intervene for that child but you don’t know how or what would be helpful. Read how one kind word or gesture could help defuse the situation.

ADHD: A Controversial Diagnosis

Recent New York Times stories on the diagnosis and treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) suggest that pharmaceutical companies, doctors, and even parents have added to what is the perceived overdiagnosis of this developmental disability and that the benefits of medication as a primary treatment have been overblown. While we need to be cautious about overdiagnosis and prescribing medication when unnecessary, we also need to take ADHD symptoms seriously, especially when it comes to injury prevention and driving.

Child Injury Prevention Holiday Wish List

In the spirit of my previous Thanksgiving post about items for which I’m grateful in the pediatric injury world, I thought I’d make my holiday “wish list” for the next year and beyond.

Teachable Moments: Starting the Conversation About Driving With Teens

Last week I had an opportunity to talk with fellow nurses at the 11th Annual Conference for Pediatric Surgical and Trauma Nursing at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) on teen driving safety. I spoke with nurses working in emergency departments, intensive care units, trauma clinics and surgical units about teen crash prevention. While clinical care for a teen injured in a motor vehicle crash is an important topic to address, I instead took the opportunity to highlight how we as nurses can play a critical role in educating teens and their families about teen driver safety so that further tragedies can be prevented.

Improving Outcomes for Seriously Injured Children

When we think about trauma and prevention we often focus on death as the outcome. However, functional disability from trauma is far more common than death and can cause long-term physical and cognitive impairment despite inpatient rehabilitation. In fact, 95 percent of children and young adults survive moderate to severe trauma. How can we best measure these impairments in a standardized manner? What happens to these patients when they leave the hospital and inpatient rehabilitation? Are we doing all we can to ensure these children recover to reach their fullest potential?

Posttraumatic Stress After Pediatric Injury: What Practitioners Should Know

As a pediatric nurse, I know that the impact of injury for children and parents can sometimes go beyond the physical wound and that a full recovery can require more than the excellent medical care we now know how to provide. According to a recent research review in JAMA: Pediatrics by my colleague, Nancy Kassam-Adams, PhD, a substantial body of research shows that posttraumatic stress (PTS) symptoms are common after pediatric injury and that these symptoms can affect a child’s physical and functional recovery. As pediatric health practitioners, we play a crucial role in recognizing and addressing PTS reactions in our injured patients.Here's what you can do.

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