Center for Injury Research and Prevention

August 2019

Improving Snakebite Care

As the Medical Director of the Poison Control Center at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), I am often asked to provide injury prevention advocacy on snakebite care to our service area. Globally, snakebites and snake envenomation (the process by which venom is injected by the snake) are major causes of injury and death, even to children. Antivenom is a precious commodity that may save limb or life, but more health services research is needed to help define the best practices with respect to utilization of this resource. We also need to empower and engage communities and strengthen health systems to ensure safe and effective treatment.

Decreasing Aggression in Schools: CHOP’s Friend to Friend Program Expands Across the Philadelphia School District

Read a selection from a CHOP Research Institute Cornerstone blog about a new National Institutes of Health grant that will allow for the expansion of Friend to Friend, a school-based relational aggression intervention designed specifically for 3rd to 5th grade girls.

After Internship, Writing Remains Her Focus

Hadley McVeigh, a senior at Gettysburg College, hopes to pursue a career in advertising with a copywriting focus and thanks the Outreach and Advocacy team at CIRP for helping to solidify her chosen career path.

A Child’s Caregiver Matters-- Risks to Children’s Physical Safety

Newly published research adds to the existing literature establishing a link between child abuse and a male caregiver.

Making Machine Learning Accessible to Medical Researchers

The METACHOP (Math, Engineering, Technology) Research Affinity Group at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia recently hosted its inaugural Machine Learning Workshop with a goal to make this approach accessible to medical researchers.

We Are All Part of the Solution to Prevent Violence in Philadelphia

Those of us who work with children and families see firsthand the incredible toll that traumatic events such as gunshot wounds take, emotionally, physically, cognitively, and behaviorally. As a community, we have a shared responsibility to protect our children from harm and to hold each other accountable.