Social cognitions, distress, and leadership self-efficacy: Associations with aggression for high-risk minority youth.

TitleSocial cognitions, distress, and leadership self-efficacy: Associations with aggression for high-risk minority youth.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsLeff SS, Baker CN, Waasdorp TE, Vaughn NA, Bevans KB, Thomas NA, Guerra T, Hausman AJ, W Monopoli J
JournalDevelopment and Psychopathology
Volume26
Issue3
Pagination759-72
Date Published08/2014
ISSN1469-2198
Abstract

Urban ethnic minority youth are often exposed to high levels of aggression and violence. As such, many aggression intervention programs that have been designed with suburban nonethnic minority youth have been used or slightly adapted in order to try and meet the needs of high-risk urban youth. The current study contributes to the literature base by examining how well a range of social-cognitive, emotional distress and victimization, and prosocial factors are related to youth aggression in a sample of urban youth. This study utilized data gathered from 109 9- to 15-year-old youth (36.7% male; 84.4% African American) and their parents or caregivers. A series of hierarchical multiple regressions were fit predicting youth aggression from social-cognitive variables, victimization and distress, and prosocial variables, controlling for youth gender and age. Each set of variables explained a significant and unique amount of the variance in youth aggressive behavior. The full model including all predictors accounted for 41% of the variance in aggression. Models suggest that youth with stronger beliefs supportive of violence, youth who experience more overt victimization, and youth who experience greater distress in overtly aggressive situations are likely to be more aggressive. In contrast, youth with higher self-esteem and youth who endorse greater leadership efficacy are likely to be less aggressive. Contrary to hypotheses, hostile attributional bias and knowledge of social information processing, experience of relational victimization, distress in relationally aggressive situations, and community engagement were not associated with aggression. Our study is one of the first to address these important questions for low-income, predominately ethnic minority urban youth, and it has clear implications for adapting aggression prevention programs to be culturally sensitive for urban African American youth.

DOI10.1017/S0954579414000376
Alternate JournalDev. Psychopathol.
PubMed ID25047297