Acute stress, depression, and anxiety symptoms among english and spanish speaking children with recent trauma exposure.

TitleAcute stress, depression, and anxiety symptoms among english and spanish speaking children with recent trauma exposure.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsBarber BA, Kohl KL, Kassam-Adams N, Gold JI
JournalJ Clin Psychol Med Settings
Volume21
Issue1
Pagination66-71
Date Published03/2014
ISSN1573-3572
Abstract

A growing literature suggests the clinical importance of acute stress disorder symptoms in youth following potentially traumatic events. A multisite sample of English and Spanish speaking children and adolescents (N = 479) between the ages of 8-17, along with their caregivers completed interviews and self-report questionnaires between 2 days and 1 month following the event. The results indicate that children with greater total acute stress symptoms reported greater depressive (r = .41, p < .01) and anxiety symptoms (r = .53, p < .01). Examining specific acute stress subscales, reexperiencing was correlated with anxiety (r = .47, p < .01) and arousal was correlated with depression (r = .50, p < .01) and anxiety (r = .55, p < .01). Age was inversely associated with total acute stress symptoms (r = -.24, p < .01), reexperiencing (r = -.17, p < .01), avoidance (r = -.27, p < .01), and arousal (r = -.19, p < .01) and gender was related to total anxiety symptoms (Spearman's ρ = .17, p < .01). The current study supports the importance of screening acute stress symptoms and other mental health outcomes following a potentially traumatic event in children and adolescents. Early screening may enable clinicians to identify and acutely intervene to support children's psychological and physical recovery.

DOI10.1007/s10880-013-9382-z
Alternate JournalJ Clin Psychol Med Settings
PubMed ID24337685