Prevalence of and risk factors for poor functioning after isolated mild traumatic brain injury in children.

TitlePrevalence of and risk factors for poor functioning after isolated mild traumatic brain injury in children.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsZonfrillo MR, Dennis DR, Koepsell T, Wang J, Temkin NR, Dorsch A, Vavilala MS, Jaffe KM, Rivara FP
JournalJ Neurotrauma
Date Published2013 Dec 2
ISSN1557-9042
Abstract

This study aimed to determine the prevalence and predictors of poor 3- and 12-month quality of life outcomes in a cohort of pediatric patients with isolated mild TBI. We conducted a prospective cohort study of children <18 years treated for an isolated mild TBI, defined as no radiographically apparent intracranial injury or an isolated skull fracture, and no other clinically significant non-head injuries. The main outcome measure was the change in quality of life from baseline at 3 and 12 months following injury, as measured by the Pediatric Quality of Life index (PedsQL). Poor functioning was defined as a decrease in total PedsQL score of more than 15 points between baseline and follow-up scores (at 3 and 12 months). Of the 329 patients who met inclusion criteria, 11.3% (95% CI 8.3%-15.3%) at 3 months and 12.9% (95% CI 9.6%-17.2%) at 12 months following injury had relatively poor functioning. Significant predictors of poor functioning included less parental education, Hispanic ethnicity (at 3 months following injury, but not 12 months); low household income (at 3 and 12 months), and Medicaid insurance (at 12 months only). Children sustaining a mild TBI who are socioeconomically disadvantaged may require additional intervention to mitigate the effects of mild TBI on their functioning.

DOI10.1089/neu.2013.3088
Alternate JournalJ. Neurotrauma
PubMed ID24294826