Research in Action Blog

The world of child injury prevention advances quickly in big and small steps each day. The Research in Action blog shares credible and timely commentary on the latest news, research, events, and more as we work together to keep children safe. We invite thought-provoking comments to spur friendly conversation among our readers. We feel that the regular posting of well-informed commentary by our readers will only enhance the quality of our blog. Comments are moderated by the Research in Action blog staff. The comments section is not intended to be a forum for specific parenting advice or to promote a product. Please use the "Contact Us" form for any information requests. Read more about our Commenting Guidelines.

Looking Forward to Lifesavers in Denver, Part One

Plane tickets, hotel reservations and registrations are booked for a strong CIRP@CHOP presence at the Lifesavers Conference. I hope we’ll see you in Denver on April 14th to 16th. Lifesavers attendees will be among the first to hear about our ongoing research to inform targeted engineering, policy and education countermeasures to reduce injuries and deaths among child motor vehicle occupants in three separate presentations.

Policy Petri Dish – New Jersey Decal Study Resonates

This week, we were excited to learn that our article “Graduated Driver Licensing (GDL) Decal Law: Effect on Young Probationary Drivers” has been selected Robert Wood Johnson Research Foundation's No. 1 Most Influential Research Article of 2012 . How did a study on a single provision of one state’s GDL program grab the attention of health care policy stakeholders? I asked Allison Curry, PhD, MPH, lead author and director of epidemiology at CIRP@CHOP, about why she thought the study resonated so strongly with the broader public health community. She gave much credit to the state of New Jersey. Participate in a free Webinar on the topic on March 21, 2013, sponsored by the Network for Public Health Law.

Swimming the English Channel for CIRP

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to swim the English Channel? Imagine swimming 21 miles in 57-degree water with no wet suit, while negotiating tides in one of the busiest shipping lanes in the world. Well, Ika Kovacikova, one of our 2012 Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) participants, is taking on the challenge and dedicating proceeds from her English Channel swim to CHOP's Violence Intervention Program.

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