Research in Action Blog

The world of child injury prevention advances quickly in big and small steps each day. The Research in Action blog shares credible and timely commentary on the latest news, research, events, and more as we work together to keep children safe. We invite thought-provoking comments to spur friendly conversation among our readers. We feel that the regular posting of well-informed commentary by our readers will only enhance the quality of our blog. Comments are moderated by the Research in Action blog staff. The comments section is not intended to be a forum for specific parenting advice or to promote a product. Please use the "Contact Us" form for any information requests. Read more about our Commenting Guidelines.

Using the Lab to Improve Tools for Child Restraint System Safety Design

I recently received practical questions from an audience of Child Passenger Safety (CPS) technicians about how they should share with parents the results of my on-going research. The short answer is: continue to educate parents exactly as you have been doing using current National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) guidelines. Child safety seats and booster seats, as they are, are very effective at protecting children in crashes. However, until all preventable injuries have been eliminated, we will strive to continue to reduce that risk. One way is to improve the tools we use to design child restraint systems...

Ending the School Year With Safety

May is Global Youth Traffic Safety Month™ (GYTSM) and the perfect time to remind parents and teens to promote safe driving and passenger behaviors during prom, graduation, and other special events that mark the end of the school year.

Putting the Rear Seat First

Seventy percent of rear seat occupants are children and adolescents, so it’s important to consider their unique safety needs as part of any improvements to the rear seat. Released today, a new CPS Issue Report provides recommendations for research and policy to help guide traffic safety colleagues in their consideration of priorities for safety in the rear seat, especially as it pertains to NHTSA’s Request for Comment to identify needed improvements to the New Car Assessment Program.

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