Research in Action Blog

The world of child injury prevention advances quickly in big and small steps each day. The Research in Action blog shares credible and timely commentary on the latest news, research, events, and more as we work together to keep children safe. We invite thought-provoking comments to spur friendly conversation among our readers. We feel that the regular posting of well-informed commentary by our readers will only enhance the quality of our blog. Comments are moderated by the Research in Action blog staff. The comments section is not intended to be a forum for specific parenting advice or to promote a product. Please use the "Contact Us" form for any information requests. Read more about our Commenting Guidelines.

Crash Data Collection: Keeping Focus on Children

Today, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is holding a public meeting to gather input on its efforts to significantly upgrade the National Automotive Sampling System (NASS) for the first time since NASS’s inception in the 1970’s. NASS collects data on a nationally representative sample of police-reported motor vehicle traffic crashes and related injuries, and therefore plays a pivotal role in research, legislation, and policy. CIRP@CHOP has been working with NHTSA since 2007 to develop the National Child Occupant Special Study (NCOSS), a system for collecting supplemental child-specific data as part of NASS-GES (General Estimates System), and will continue to be vocal in ensuring the unique safety needs of children are considered as NASS is modernized.

Minimizing Risk of Unintentional Injury For Children with Disabilities- Part Two

Last week we discussed why children with developmental disabilities are at risk for unintentional injury. Today I'll share some tips and resources on keeping kids with developmental disabilities safe, especially in the summer.

Minimizing Risk of Unintentional Injury For Children with Disabilities- Part One

A couple of summers ago, I awoke to the sound of the doorbell ringing at 7AM. Puzzled, I looked through the window and saw a young girl with Down syndrome standing on our front step. She said that she was lost and didn’t know where her mom was. We quickly called the police, and thankfully, her mother found us within a short period of time, explaining that her daughter had run out of the house while they were preparing for a move. Thankfully, no one was hurt during that experience, but it was a dangerous situation. With the recent buzz of excitement in my clinical practice about summer’s increased outdoor time, I thought it would be helpful to discuss why children with developmental disabilities are at higher risk of unintentional injury when the weather’s warm. And in a future post, to share prevention tools that are available.

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