Research in Action Blog

The world of child injury prevention advances quickly in big and small steps each day. The Research in Action blog shares credible and timely commentary on the latest news, research, events, and more as we work together to keep children safe. We invite thought-provoking comments to spur friendly conversation among our readers. We feel that the regular posting of well-informed commentary by our readers will only enhance the quality of our blog. Comments are moderated by the Research in Action blog staff. The comments section is not intended to be a forum for specific parenting advice or to promote a product. Please use the "Contact Us" form for any information requests. Read more about our Commenting Guidelines.

Students Making An Impact

Great things are happening here at CIRP. With strong mentorship, lots of talent, and hard work, our student trainees are making significant contributions. We currently have 30 undergraduate, graduate, and post-doc students working at our Center, with nine participating as part of our National Science Foundation Injury Science Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program.

Autism and Flying

With the upcoming summer vacations, I'm fielding a lot of questions in my developmental pediatrics clinic about flying. Flying can generally be a stressful experience for any traveler but especially so for some of my patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and their families. The crowds, changes in routine, and unpredictable events can have a way of triggering anxieties and possibly behavioral difficulties for children with ASD (along with other developmental disabilities).

Repair the World or Stop It From Breaking?

The three-year old boy had a low grade fever and runny nose. Mom was sleeping in the corner of the room when I came in and barely awakened when I knocked on the door. Our conversation was short and to the point as I went through my routine “it’s a virus, tincture of time” talk. Leaving the room, the mom asked me for a taxi voucher. She did not want to call Freddie’s father for a ride back. With one more question, easily skipped, I learned that she and the child’s father had been fighting about their son’s cough keeping him awake. Freddie’s father had kicked them out of the house to find a doctor to “fix him or I will fix him, and you.” Turns out that Freddie and his mom were living in a house of fear and uncertainty. We see kids like Freddie each day. Sometimes we can sense that something is off but are afraid to ask that next question. Oftentimes, we cannot see the problem until we ask the right questions. Emergency medical providers may not feel that learning about these issues is their role. The first part of addressing a “chronic illness” is recognizing it. The next time you get “that feeling” see what a few straightforward, respectful questions can reveal.

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