Research in Action Blog

The world of child injury prevention advances quickly in big and small steps each day. The Research in Action blog shares credible and timely commentary on the latest news, research, events, and more as we work together to keep children safe. We invite thought-provoking comments to spur friendly conversation among our readers. We feel that the regular posting of well-informed commentary by our readers will only enhance the quality of our blog. Comments are moderated by the Research in Action blog staff. The comments section is not intended to be a forum for specific parenting advice or to promote a product. Please use the "Contact Us" form for any information requests. Read more about our Commenting Guidelines.

Make the Most of GDL's Learner Phase

As a developmental psychologist, I am thrilled that this year’s theme for National Teen Driver Safety Week (October 20-26) is It Takes Two: Shared Expectations for Teens and Parents for Driving. This theme emphasizes that research and practice efforts should consider the family unit as opposed to focusing on parents and teens in isolation.

Minimizing ‘Permissive Sub-optimal Restraint’

This month, Safe Kids released an interesting report based on a recent survey of more than 1,000 parents and caregivers with children 10 years and younger. Nearly one in four respondents stated that they have driven without their child in a car seat or booster seat. Even more concerning was that some parents are comfortable with keeping their children inappropriately restrained under certain conditions, including: during shorter trips, when driving at night, if in a rush, or if trying to ‘reward’ the child. This ‘permissive sub-optimal restraint’ was seen more frequently in certain subgroups of parents including those who were younger or with higher education and household income.

Trends in Child Injury: An Article Review

I recently came across a new review article on child injury prevention by Drs. Brian Johnston and Beth Ebel at University of Washington. In it, they describe that although overall unintentional injury death among US children aged 0-19 years in 2000-2009 fell by 30%, there is still much work to be done.

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