Research in Action Blog

The world of child injury prevention advances quickly in big and small steps each day. The Research in Action blog shares credible and timely commentary on the latest news, research, events, and more as we work together to keep children safe. We invite thought-provoking comments to spur friendly conversation among our readers. We feel that the regular posting of well-informed commentary by our readers will only enhance the quality of our blog. Comments are moderated by the Research in Action blog staff. The comments section is not intended to be a forum for specific parenting advice or to promote a product. Please use the "Contact Us" form for any information requests. Read more about our Commenting Guidelines.

Gimme an “E” for Digital Health Research

Last month I had the pleasure of attending the 5th annual mHealth Summit outside of Washington DC and presenting at its Pharmaceuticals and Life Sciences Roundtable. Over 5,000 people attended, representing a broad array of stakeholders in mHealth (aka “mobile health”) including the federal government, academia, the health care industry, software development, and small business. Across all the great discourse I heard a common theme: that innovations in mHealth, such as health apps for smartphones and web-based health interventions, will only survive in the long-term if they are actually effective at improving health! This got me thinking about how we’re focusing on the letter “E” in our Digital Health research at CIRP@CHOP: through evidence, evaluation, ecosystem, and engagement.

Empirical Evidence Supports Cognitive Rest After Concussion

Published this week, a study in Pediatrics provides evidence for cognitive rest as an effective strategy following a concussion. Naomi Brown, MD, a Sports Medicine specialist at CHOP, found that study participants with the highest levels of activity suffered longer duration of symptoms than those with lower levels of cognitive activity. Kristy Arbogast, PhD speaks with Dr. Brown about the research questions that would help clinicians, as well as a new assessment tool called the Cognitive Activity Scale.

Is There a Difference in Child Passenger Safety Practices Between Mothers and Fathers?

Historically, there has been limited research on the child passenger safety practices of mother versus father drivers.

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