Research in Action Blog

The world of child injury prevention advances quickly in big and small steps each day. The Research in Action blog shares credible and timely commentary on the latest news, research, events, and more as we work together to keep children safe. We invite thought-provoking comments to spur friendly conversation among our readers. We feel that the regular posting of well-informed commentary by our readers will only enhance the quality of our blog. Comments are moderated by the Research in Action blog staff. The comments section is not intended to be a forum for specific parenting advice or to promote a product. Please use the "Contact Us" form for any information requests. Read more about our Commenting Guidelines.

The Role of the Pediatrician in Child Passenger Safety

Recent CHOP research published in The Journal of Pediatrics explores the awareness, attitudes, and dissemination practices of pediatricians two years following the release of the revised policy statement on child passenger safety from the American Academy of Pediatrics.

50 Years Later: The Rear-facing Child Seat

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the rear-facing child safety seat, a pivotal innovation in the field of child occupant protection. While there have been impressive strides made in child passenger safety in the US and abroad over the past few decades, there is still work to be done to ensure all children are optimally protected in motor vehicle crashes.

Teens and Distracted Walking

Our team came across this great infographic from Safe Kids about pedestrian safety -- “How Does a Teenager Cross the Road?”. Based on over 34,000 observations and discussion groups with more than 2,400 students during the 2012-2013 school year, their research indicates that a significant number of high school and middle school students cross the street while distracted, most frequently texting or using headphones. Although older teens account for half of all pedestrian deaths among children age 19 or younger, only one-fifth of teens felt that their age group was the most at risk for pedestrian injuries. To understand these findings, it is helpful to review brain development during adolescence and how teens make decisions.

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