traumatic stress

Parent Injury Can Cause Stress for a Child

June 19, 2014
Nearly two decades ago our team was planning a follow-up study with parents of injured children treated in the Emergency Department. In the very first phone interview for the study, I spoke with the mother of a teenager injured in a traffic crash. She was very happy to answer our questions about her son’s recovery but quickly added, “You should be asking about me! My son is doing well now. I am a mess.” She went on to describe feeling worried and afraid every time her son left the house, even though she knew he was not in real danger. This mother’s voice was crucial. She reminded us of the importance of asking about a parent’s own responses to a child’s injury. But what happens to the child when it is the parent who is injured?

After The Injury en español: Reaching Spanish-speaking Parents

May 29, 2014

According to 2012 US Census figures, 53 million people of Latino heritage live in the United States and 74 percent speak Spanish at home, by far the largest language (other than English) in US households. More than 4 million Latino households include children under age 18, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that in 2012 nearly 1 million Latino children received Emergency Department or inpatient hospital care for injury. 

For Healthcare Providers, Healing Doesn’t End With the Patient

April 17, 2014
Traumatic stress in healthcare providers may seem like "part of the job," but it can have a profound impact on their professional and personal lives. This post provides actionable steps for healthcare providers to manage their own traumatic stress reactions in the clinical setting.

Why Preventing Pediatric Injury Death Is Only Part of the Puzzle

April 2, 2014
In a letter published today in the Australian & New Zealand Journal of Public Health, I commend the work being done by my pediatric injury prevention research colleagues in New Zealand to help reduce child injury mortality in their country. They developed injury prevention recommendations that were published late last year in the Australian & New Zealand Journal of Public Health using a well-developed European Child Safety Report Card model as a metric for comparison. However, I believe that it is important to further adapt these Report Card metrics and also measure reduction in non-fatal morbidity from injuries in children.

New Symposium: Utilizing Web-Based Programs to Promote Child Health

March 17, 2014

For those attending the Society of Pediatric Psychology Annual Conference in Philadelphia at the end of March, please take note of a symposium being held from 1:40 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. on Saturday, March 29th featuring members of CIRP's Post-injury Care and Recovery (PICAR) team. Come and join in the discussion, "Utilizing Web-based Programs to Promote Child Health: Primary Prevention, Secondary Prevention, and Treatment," with Meghan Marsac, PhD, and Nancy Kassam Adams, PhD.

Try One Kind Word

March 13, 2014
All of us have been there. You are in a hospital reception area, riding public transit, or some other public gathering space. You see a parent telling a young child they are stupid or to shut up or is yanking their arm forcefully. It’s not rising to the level of “child abuse” for reporting purposes, but in your heart you know that those small, daily acts of violence can add up and have a real impact on that child’s development and well-being. You want to intervene for that child but you don’t know how or what would be helpful. Read how one kind word or gesture could help defuse the situation.

Posttraumatic Stress After Pediatric Injury: What Practitioners Should Know

October 15, 2013
As a pediatric nurse, I know that the impact of injury for children and parents can sometimes go beyond the physical wound and that a full recovery can require more than the excellent medical care we now know how to provide. According to a recent research review in JAMA: Pediatrics by my colleague, Nancy Kassam-Adams, PhD, a substantial body of research shows that posttraumatic stress (PTS) symptoms are common after pediatric injury and that these symptoms can affect a child’s physical and functional recovery. As pediatric health practitioners, we play a crucial role in recognizing and addressing PTS reactions in our injured patients.Here's what you can do.

Coming to Terms with Trauma

August 8, 2013
Something we focus on in our Post-injury Care and Recovery research at CIRP@CHOP is the difference between everyday stressors and more serious traumatic stress reactions that can lead to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This difference is uniquely explored in a recent New York Times article by psychiatrist and author Mark Epstein entitled, “The Trauma of Being Alive."

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