research tools and methods

Early Intervention After Child Trauma: Do We Know What Works?

July 22, 2014
When traumatic events affect children we all want to help. In the aftermath of large-scale tragedies, communities are often deluged with donations and offers of assistance, not all of them useful. How to help in a way that is useful and supportive of children’s natural recovery processes is a pressing issue in the field of traumatic stress. Dr. Kassam-Adams proposes a guide to researchers and practitioners to meet the challenge.

The Evolving Science of Crash Data Collection

July 15, 2014
Many of our readers involved in traffic safety research are aware that the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is moving forward with the modernization of the National Automotive Sampling System (NASS) for the first time since NASS’s inception over 40 years ago. CIRP@CHOP has (and will continue to) partner with NHTSA to ensure that the unique safety needs of children are considered as NASS is updated.

New Resource Alert: Redesigned Child Passenger Safety Charts

July 10, 2014

Today, CIRP@CHOP has made available redesigned child passenger safety charts that provide valuable insight for child passenger safety (CPS) technicians, educators, researchers, and policymakers. Based on data collected through CHOP’s Partners for Child Passenger Safety (PCPS) study, the charts have been graphically updated for use in presentations and other educational settings. Each is available in both PDF and PowerPoint format for easy use.

Toward A Better Understanding of Teen Driver Crashes

April 7, 2014
In an editorial published today in JAMA Pediatrics, I commend the work being done by my teen driver safety colleagues at Virginia Tech as part of the Naturalistic Teen Driving Study. The study by Ouimet et al.¹ examines the association between cortisol reactivity and crashes and near-crashes among newly-licensed teens. While these findings do present an interesting new line of research, they do not suggest that we are close to developing a clinically useful biomarker-based diagnostic test nor a pharmaceutical therapy to reduce the risk for teen driver crashes. Continued research is needed.

Why the Focus Should Be on “Engaged Driving” for Teens

March 30, 2014
While working with other auto safety researchers over the past year as part of a distracted driving panel organized by the Association for the Advancement of Automotive Medicine (AAAM) and State Farm®, I have been introduced to the term “engaged driving” and prefer it to the term “distracted driving.” I think it better describes what we want drivers to do to be safe.

A Researcher’s Keys to Administrative Data

January 28, 2014

The CIRP@CHOP Teen Driver Safety Research team uses several methodological approaches in our research, including: evidence-based intervention design and evaluation, driving simulation, on road driving assessment, and analysis of existing data sources. As the CIRP@CHOP Director of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, I have been working to find ways to improve the methods with which researchers analyze existing data sources to boost teen driver safety.

Buyer Beware: When One Study Contradicts All the Rest

October 29, 2013
A recently published research article seemingly contradicted a body of research supporting belt-positioning booster seats as protective for children in crashes, suggesting instead a higher risk of injury to the neck and thorax for children in boosters as compared to belts alone. Upon further review, there were several methodological concerns with the study, highlighting the significance of taking a critical look at new research, particularly that which contradicts many studies before it.
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