pediatric trauma care

Consider This Framework for Treating PTS in Children After Acute Medical Trauma

December 2, 2014
Working at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, I have been impressed by our medical teams’ efforts to support children and families by paying attention to both their physical treatment and recovery, as well as their emotional recovery. In assessing our patients for medical treatment, many questions need to be answered for our team to help promote optimal recovery and to minimize negative emotional reactions such as posttraumatic stress. We recently developed a new model to help organize our thought processes and questions around recovery from medical events and to fuel future research in understanding factors that are associated with child outcomes.

New Resource Alert: After The Injury or Illness Tipsheets for Siblings in English and Spanish

November 11, 2014
To help families cope after a sibling has been injured, the Center for Pediatric Traumatic Stress (CPTS) has created evidence-based tipsheets in both English and Spanish. These helpful resources were developed based on recommendations from the CPTS Family Advisory Board.

After The Injury en español: Reaching Spanish-speaking Parents

May 29, 2014

According to 2012 US Census figures, 53 million people of Latino heritage live in the United States and 74 percent speak Spanish at home, by far the largest language (other than English) in US households. More than 4 million Latino households include children under age 18, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that in 2012 nearly 1 million Latino children received Emergency Department or inpatient hospital care for injury. 

Posttraumatic Stress After Pediatric Injury: What Practitioners Should Know

October 15, 2013
As a pediatric nurse, I know that the impact of injury for children and parents can sometimes go beyond the physical wound and that a full recovery can require more than the excellent medical care we now know how to provide. According to a recent research review in JAMA: Pediatrics by my colleague, Nancy Kassam-Adams, PhD, a substantial body of research shows that posttraumatic stress (PTS) symptoms are common after pediatric injury and that these symptoms can affect a child’s physical and functional recovery. As pediatric health practitioners, we play a crucial role in recognizing and addressing PTS reactions in our injured patients.Here's what you can do.

Practical Policies to Prevent Injury & Manage Acute Care

July 29, 2013
In a recent study from CIRP@CHOP, we examined the potential impact on the healthcare system associated with increases in the number of young people with health insurance. We found a potential for more than 730,000 additional medically attended injuries annually, or a 6.1 percent increase, if all currently uninsured children and young adults become insured and if these newly insured youth access medical care in ways similar to those who already have insurance.

Repair the World or Stop It From Breaking?

June 4, 2013
The three-year old boy had a low grade fever and runny nose. Mom was sleeping in the corner of the room when I came in and barely awakened when I knocked on the door. Our conversation was short and to the point as I went through my routine “it’s a virus, tincture of time” talk. Leaving the room, the mom asked me for a taxi voucher. She did not want to call Freddie’s father for a ride back. With one more question, easily skipped, I learned that she and the child’s father had been fighting about their son’s cough keeping him awake. Freddie’s father had kicked them out of the house to find a doctor to “fix him or I will fix him, and you.” Turns out that Freddie and his mom were living in a house of fear and uncertainty. We see kids like Freddie each day. Sometimes we can sense that something is off but are afraid to ask that next question. Oftentimes, we cannot see the problem until we ask the right questions. Emergency medical providers may not feel that learning about these issues is their role. The first part of addressing a “chronic illness” is recognizing it. The next time you get “that feeling” see what a few straightforward, respectful questions can reveal.
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