Research in Action Blog

The world of child injury prevention advances quickly in big and small steps each day. The Research in Action blog shares credible and timely commentary on the latest news, research, events, and more as we work together to keep children safe. We invite thought-provoking comments to spur friendly conversation among our readers. We feel that the regular posting of well-informed commentary by our readers will only enhance the quality of our blog. Comments are moderated by the Research in Action blog staff. The comments section is not intended to be a forum for specific parenting advice or to promote a product. Please use the "Contact Us" form for any information requests. Read more about our Commenting Guidelines.

CHOP Kicks Off National Bullying Prevention Month with Congressional Presentation

Earlier this week, CHOP began National Bullying Prevention Month with a presentation to members of the Congressional Anti-Bullying Caucus in Washington, DC. The topic was Free2B- an evidence-based, multimedia bullying prevention program for 7th and 8th graders developed as part of CHOP's Violence Prevention Initiative.

A Need to Support Older Novice Drivers: National Teen Driver Safety Week

Recent research tells us that nationally a significant minority of drivers get their licenses after their 18th birthday. These young drivers get licensed without the protective benefits of Graduated Driver Licensing (GDL), except in New Jersey where full GDL extends to all novice drivers under age 21, and without exposure to educational campaigns when they first begin to drive. For National Teen Driver Safety Week (#teendriving2014), CIRP@CHOP hopes to spark a new conversation about actions we can take to support this vulnerable group.

Critical Safety Errors of Learner Teen Drivers

While restrictions during the early independent driving period help to reduce crashes during those first critical months by reducing exposure to high risk driving situations, teens still enter this phase with specific skill deficits that could have been addressed more effectively in the learner phase. Ideally, driver training and supervised practice during the Learner Permit phase would be focused on the critical safety-relevant errors that teens are likely to make so that teens enter the Intermediate License phase with better tactical driving skills, rather than just the vehicle operations skills necessary to pass a basic licensing exam.

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