Research in Action Blog

The world of child injury prevention advances quickly in big and small steps each day. The Research in Action blog shares credible and timely commentary on the latest news, research, events, and more as we work together to keep children safe. We invite thought-provoking comments to spur friendly conversation among our readers. We feel that the regular posting of well-informed commentary by our readers will only enhance the quality of our blog. Comments are moderated by the Research in Action blog staff. The comments section is not intended to be a forum for specific parenting advice or to promote a product. Please use the "Contact Us" form for any information requests. Read more about our Commenting Guidelines.

Reducing the Impact of a Potentially Traumatic Event

Pediatric healthcare providers have the unique opportunity to impact the reactions of families and patients to a potentially traumatic event (PTE). This blog post shares how to guide patients to reframe their thoughts and to foster resilience by practicing trauma-informed care.

Sharing the Science Behind GDL Decals

In this informative post, Allison E. Curry, PhD,MPH shares her research that supports state efforts to consider a GDL decal provision to enhance teen driver safety.

Speak Up and Screen: A Reaction to Recent Suicide Clusters

In the wake of another suicide cluster in California, learn what we can do to prevent these tragedies from occurring.

The Evolution of Teen Dating Violence Research: Understanding the Complexity of Gender Roles

This post explores how teen dating violence research has expanded and diversified, particularly around gender differences. While partner violence first gained recognition as a women’s issue, more recent research sheds light on the nuances around victimization and perpetration rates across genders for various forms of violence.

Health Policy to Address Teen Dating Violence

Teen dating violence, defined by as physical, sexual, psychological, or emotional violence within a dating relationship, including stalking, is unfortunately pervasive, as approximately 1 in 3 teens in the United States report being a victim of physical, sexual, emotional or verbal abuse from a dating partner in the past 12 months. Research in the field of teen dating violence has progressed and diversified in recent years, but it’s important to consider how this work has impacted health policy.

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