Research in Action Blog

The world of child injury prevention advances quickly in big and small steps each day. The Research in Action blog shares credible and timely commentary on the latest news, research, events, and more as we work together to keep children safe. We invite thought-provoking comments to spur friendly conversation among our readers. We feel that the regular posting of well-informed commentary by our readers will only enhance the quality of our blog. Comments are moderated by the Research in Action blog staff. The comments section is not intended to be a forum for specific parenting advice or to promote a product. Please use the "Contact Us" form for any information requests. Read more about our Commenting Guidelines.

Swimming the English Channel for CIRP

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to swim the English Channel? Imagine swimming 21 miles in 57-degree water with no wet suit, while negotiating tides in one of the busiest shipping lanes in the world. Well, Ika Kovacikova, one of our 2012 Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) participants, is taking on the challenge and dedicating proceeds from her English Channel swim to CHOP's Violence Intervention Program.

Disabling Injuries in Children

While injury is still the leading cause of death for children older than 1 year of age, we have made great strides in reducing the number of children killed from trauma, particularly in motor vehicle crashes. This is something the injury prevention community should be proud of and continue to work toward. However, given that the overall survival rate for children with moderate to severe trauma is greater than 95 percent, it is equally as important to understand the burden of disabling injuries in children.

Asking Kids About Traumatic Stress- Our Research

As clinicians or researchers, we often turn to parents to tell us how their child is faring emotionally. Parents are THE experts on their child, and are a great source of information about changes in a child’s usual behaviors. But research and clinical experience have shown that parents may not always grasp a child’s emotional symptoms. After a scary event, it is crucial to ask children directly about their own traumatic stress reactions.

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