Research in Action Blog

The world of child injury prevention advances quickly in big and small steps each day. The Research in Action blog shares credible and timely commentary on the latest news, research, events, and more as we work together to keep children safe. We invite thought-provoking comments to spur friendly conversation among our readers. We feel that the regular posting of well-informed commentary by our readers will only enhance the quality of our blog. Comments are moderated by the Research in Action blog staff. The comments section is not intended to be a forum for specific parenting advice or to promote a product. Please use the "Contact Us" form for any information requests. Read more about our Commenting Guidelines.

Minimizing Risk of Unintentional Injury For Children with Disabilities- Part Two

Last week we discussed why children with developmental disabilities are at risk for unintentional injury. Today I'll share some tips and resources on keeping kids with developmental disabilities safe, especially in the summer.

Minimizing Risk of Unintentional Injury For Children with Disabilities- Part One

A couple of summers ago, I awoke to the sound of the doorbell ringing at 7AM. Puzzled, I looked through the window and saw a young girl with Down syndrome standing on our front step. She said that she was lost and didn’t know where her mom was. We quickly called the police, and thankfully, her mother found us within a short period of time, explaining that her daughter had run out of the house while they were preparing for a move. Thankfully, no one was hurt during that experience, but it was a dangerous situation. With the recent buzz of excitement in my clinical practice about summer’s increased outdoor time, I thought it would be helpful to discuss why children with developmental disabilities are at higher risk of unintentional injury when the weather’s warm. And in a future post, to share prevention tools that are available.

What to Look for in a Mentor and Mentee

I didn’t recognize the importance of mentors until I was a graduate student at the University of Toledo and stumbled upon Jeanne Brockmyer, PhD, distinguished emeritus professor of Psychology. This amazing mentor helped to identify my goals (some of which I didn’t even know myself) and worked with me to develop concrete strategies to achieve those goals. My experience with this knowledgeable and caring individual led me to seek out mentors at every step of my career and to become an effective mentor myself.

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