Research in Action Blog

The world of child injury prevention advances quickly in big and small steps each day. The Research in Action blog shares credible and timely commentary on the latest news, research, events, and more as we work together to keep children safe. We invite thought-provoking comments to spur friendly conversation among our readers. We feel that the regular posting of well-informed commentary by our readers will only enhance the quality of our blog. Comments are moderated by the Research in Action blog staff. The comments section is not intended to be a forum for specific parenting advice or to promote a product. Please use the "Contact Us" form for any information requests. Read more about our Commenting Guidelines.

Igniting an Interest in Injury Science

When talking to casual acquaintances, the requisite “what do you do?” comes up. When I say I’m the Training Manager for a CHOP-based Injury Science center, they first ask, “What does the Center research?” and then ask, “So, who do you train?” No one is ever surprised that we provide training to master’s, PhD, and post-doc level trainees--It’s what’s expected of a teaching hospital. But most are surprised when they learn that the majority of CIRP@CHOP's training efforts focus on undergraduates.

Gear Up for National Teen Driver Safety Week (NTDSW)

It’s that time of the year when schools, student clubs, and community leaders want ideas for how they can use National Teen Driver Safety Week (NTDSW) as a platform to promote teen driver safety. The 7th annual NTDSW takes place October 20-26, 2013, so now is a great time to start planning activities that can be implemented in your communities and schools during this special week and throughout the year to promote teen driver safety. This year's theme is ' It Takes Two- Shared Expectations for Teens and Parents for Driving.'

The Challenges of Child Seat Installations

Child restraint system (CRS) misuse is a common occurrence that remains a challenge for the child passenger safety community and caregivers. Particularly alarming is that, although recent estimates of CRS misuse are as high as 72 percent, other research has found that 90 percent of caregivers are confident or very confident in their installation of a CRS. In research published in Injury Prevention this month, my CIRP@CHOP colleagues and I investigated caregivers’ confidence in CRS installations with interesting results.

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