Research in Action Blog

The world of child injury prevention advances quickly in big and small steps each day. The Research in Action blog shares credible and timely commentary on the latest news, research, events, and more as we work together to keep children safe. We invite thought-provoking comments to spur friendly conversation among our readers. We feel that the regular posting of well-informed commentary by our readers will only enhance the quality of our blog. Comments are moderated by the Research in Action blog staff. The comments section is not intended to be a forum for specific parenting advice or to promote a product. Please use the "Contact Us" form for any information requests. Read more about our Commenting Guidelines.

Joining with NHTSA to Kick Off National Teen Driver Safety Week

Happy National Teen Driver Safety Week (NTDSW)! Today we are with David Strickland, the Administrator of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, at a 10 a.m. (EST) press conference at the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). The event officially kicks off a week of activities that aim to start dialogues about teen driver safety amongst families, in schools, and in communities. NTDSW is now in its seventh year.

Collaborating to Improve Car Seat Safety

Although a recent New York Times article on child restraint system misuse cautioned that car seat manufacturers and automakers do not collaborate on safety solutions, this partnership is thriving through CIRP@CHOP's Center for Child Injury Prevention Studies (CChIPS).

Posttraumatic Stress After Pediatric Injury: What Practitioners Should Know

As a pediatric nurse, I know that the impact of injury for children and parents can sometimes go beyond the physical wound and that a full recovery can require more than the excellent medical care we now know how to provide. According to a recent research review in JAMA: Pediatrics by my colleague, Nancy Kassam-Adams, PhD, a substantial body of research shows that posttraumatic stress (PTS) symptoms are common after pediatric injury and that these symptoms can affect a child’s physical and functional recovery. As pediatric health practitioners, we play a crucial role in recognizing and addressing PTS reactions in our injured patients.Here's what you can do.

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