Research in Action Blog

The world of child injury prevention advances quickly in big and small steps each day. The Research in Action blog shares credible and timely commentary on the latest news, research, events, and more as we work together to keep children safe. We invite thought-provoking comments to spur friendly conversation among our readers. We feel that the regular posting of well-informed commentary by our readers will only enhance the quality of our blog. Comments are moderated by the Research in Action blog staff. The comments section is not intended to be a forum for specific parenting advice or to promote a product. Please use the "Contact Us" form for any information requests. Read more about our Commenting Guidelines.

Developing a Game to Help Teen Drivers Manage Peer Passengers

One of the key risk factors for teen driver crashes is the presence of peer passengers. One passenger doubles the risk of a crash, and two or more passengers lead to a five times greater risk of crash. As part of the CIRP@CHOP Teen Driver Safety Research Team and the principal investigator of simulator-based research and director of the simulator program, I have been exploring the detrimental impact of peer passengers on teen drivers with my research colleague, Noelle LaVoie, PhD at Parallel Consulting, with the goal of developing an engaging intervention that helps teens to reduce passenger-related distractions. We are in the process of developing a multi-player game as an intervention to address this issue.

Poor Quality of Life for Children with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

I recently co-authored a study that identified certain groups of children with poor quality of life outcomes after suffering a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Children from low-income families, with Medicaid insurance, with less educated parents, or of Hispanic ethnicity were more likely to have poor outcomes at follow-up when compared to other children.

Gun Violence and Children - Bold Action is Imperative

Last year at this time we were enjoying the holiday season unaware of the tragedy about to unfold in Newtown, Connecticut at the Sandy Hook Elementary School. When it happened, it shook us to our core – 20 children along with 6 adults killed in a matter of minutes by a single gunman. In reaction to the emotion CHOP employees felt after Sandy Hook, our CEO, Steve M. Altschuler, MD, commented that, “We cannot let a sense of hopelessness overcome our ability to truly make a difference in an individual child’s life.” For this to stop, for children to stop being injured and killed by gunshot, bold action and change is imperative.

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