Research in Action Blog

The world of child injury prevention advances quickly in big and small steps each day. The Research in Action blog shares credible and timely commentary on the latest news, research, events, and more as we work together to keep children safe. We invite thought-provoking comments to spur friendly conversation among our readers. We feel that the regular posting of well-informed commentary by our readers will only enhance the quality of our blog. Comments are moderated by the Research in Action blog staff. The comments section is not intended to be a forum for specific parenting advice or to promote a product. Please use the "Contact Us" form for any information requests. Read more about our Commenting Guidelines.

Using Policy and Programs to Reduce Risk of School Shootings

On the eve of the second anniversary of the Sandy Hook Elementary school shooting, people are talking about "missed opportunities" to have prevented that tragic event. Now is the time to look hard at our health and education systems in the US and find ways to correct them to reduce the risk of untreated mental health issues leading to deadly mass violence. Programs and policies with these key aims could work.

Characteristics of Prolonged Concussion Recovery for Children

I recently co-authored a research article in the Journal of Pediatrics that identified pre-existing characteristics associated with prolonged recovery from concussions for children and youth (ages 5-18 years). Readers can use these data to further study risk factors for prolonged recovery, and to help with decision-making and care planning for concussion patients.

Consider This Framework for Treating PTS in Children After Acute Medical Trauma

Working at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, I have been impressed by our medical teams’ efforts to support children and families by paying attention to both their physical treatment and recovery, as well as their emotional recovery. In assessing our patients for medical treatment, many questions need to be answered for our team to help promote optimal recovery and to minimize negative emotional reactions such as posttraumatic stress. We recently developed a new model to help organize our thought processes and questions around recovery from medical events and to fuel future research in understanding factors that are associated with child outcomes.

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