Research in Action Blog

The world of child injury prevention advances quickly in big and small steps each day. The Research in Action blog shares credible and timely commentary on the latest news, research, events, and more as we work together to keep children safe. We invite thought-provoking comments to spur friendly conversation among our readers. We feel that the regular posting of well-informed commentary by our readers will only enhance the quality of our blog. Comments are moderated by the Research in Action blog staff. The comments section is not intended to be a forum for specific parenting advice or to promote a product. Please use the "Contact Us" form for any information requests. Read more about our Commenting Guidelines.

Topics from Advances in Child Injury Prevention

Two weeks ago, The Center for Child Injury Prevention Studies (CChIPS) held its annual Advances in Child Injury Prevention (ACIP) conference in Plymouth, Michigan. ACIP presents the latest research in traffic safety for children and adolescents. Attendance at ACIP has grown every year, this time attracting over 100 participants from 38 companies. Presenters include investigators funded by CChIPS as well as external investigators who are invited by CChIPS to update the participants on relevant new work. This year’s topics included...

A Twitter Chat Survival Guide: In 140 characters…or More

During the 2012 National Teen Driver Safety Week (NTDSW) on October 18, we stepped up our digital communications game by organizing and hosting our first hour-long Twitter Chat. Here are lessons learned for fellow injury prevention communicators...

Coping Coach: A Web-based Game to Help Children Recover

Millions of children experience injuries or sudden illnesses each year, leaving families to face challenging emotional reactions in addition to physical recovery. Unfortunately, there are very few resources available to support children through this recovery. To address this need, our team collaborated with colleagues at the University of Queensland in Australia to develop a web-based game called Coping Coach – a fun, interactive way to help a large number of children with their emotional recovery.

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