Teen Driver Safety

Assessing Your Teen’s Readiness to Drive

I recently heard Pam Fisher from the NJ Teen Safe Driving Coalition on Radio Times discuss, among other things, texting and driving among teens, the importance of practice, and following Graduated Driver Licensing (GDL) to enhance teen driving safety. This made me think about other conversations I've had regarding readiness to drive among teens in general. It can be easy to forget that teens who appear physically ready to drive may not be mentally ready to drive. We’ve created some questions that can help to guide a discussion between parents and pediatricians regarding driving readiness.

Can You Train the Teen Brain to Drive?

CIRP@CHOP recently welcomed Robert Isler, PhD, an associate professor of Psychology at The University of Waikato in New Zealand, for an extended visit. He has spent over the past two decades researching physiological psychology and human performance, road safety, and driver training and education to help prevent teen driver crashes. Dr. Isler created eDrive, an engaging gaming platform to train teens on higher order driving skills (i.e., visual search, situation awareness, hazard perception, insight training, and risk management). Results are so promising that the New Zealand government now offers it for free to all learner teen drivers.

New Resource Alert: Teen Driver Safety Toolset

The CIRP team has developed a toolset of the charts and graphs found in Miles to go: Focusing on Risks for Teen Driver Safety, an annual teen driver safety research report that provides a yearly snapshot of teen driver safety for the nation.

"Catch Up" Sleep for Teens May Reduce Crash Risk

Our Colleagues from the George Institute for Global Health in Sydney, Australia recently published a study in JAMA Pediatrics that demonstrates it’s worth it to let your teen sleep in on weekends. Drowsy driving is a common cause of crashes involving teen drivers. Early school start times and after school activities can cut into precious sleep time required by adolescents, who need about 8 ½ to 9 ¼ hours of sleep a night.

Topics from Advances in Child Injury Prevention

Two weeks ago, The Center for Child Injury Prevention Studies (CChIPS) held its annual Advances in Child Injury Prevention (ACIP) conference in Plymouth, Michigan. ACIP presents the latest research in traffic safety for children and adolescents. Attendance at ACIP has grown every year, this time attracting over 100 participants from 38 companies. Presenters include investigators funded by CChIPS as well as external investigators who are invited by CChIPS to update the participants on relevant new work. This year’s topics included...

A Twitter Chat Survival Guide: In 140 characters…or More

During the 2012 National Teen Driver Safety Week (NTDSW) on October 18, we stepped up our digital communications game by organizing and hosting our first hour-long Twitter Chat. Here are lessons learned for fellow injury prevention communicators...

Ending the School Year With Safety

May is Global Youth Traffic Safety Month™ (GYTSM) and the perfect time to remind parents and teens to promote safe driving and passenger behaviors during prom, graduation, and other special events that mark the end of the school year.

Now Online: NJ Decal Law Webinar Video

In a recent post, I described the health policy community’s keen interest in CIRP@CHOP’s research on New Jersey’s GDL “decal” requirement. Later that month the Public Health Law Webinar Series hosted a panel of research and program experts to discuss the NJ GDL Decal requirement.

Driving in Teens with Autism

Since April is Autism Awareness Month, I wanted to dedicate this blog to discussing the issue of driving in teens with autism spectrum disorders. Lately, I have been fielding more and more questions from parents of teens with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) about whether their teens are ready to drive.

Focusing on What Counts for Teen Drivers

While motor vehicle crashes remain the leading cause of death for teens, we have made great strides in reducing the number of crashes involving teens behind the wheel. According to a new report released today by CIRP@CHOP and State Farm®, the number of teen driver-related fatalities declined 47 percent in the past six years from a total of 5,889 in 2005 to a total of 3,150 in 2011.

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