Public Policy

A Pink Decal to Prevent Teen Crashes?

What a difference a few years make. When New Jersey implemented its first-in-the-nation decal provision as part of its Graduated Driver Licensing (GDL) program on May 1, 2010, it ignited a firestorm of protest from some parents and state legislators. Known as Kyleigh’s Law, it requires all 16- to 20-year-olds holding a learner’s permit or intermediate license to display a reflective decal on the front and back license plates of vehicles they are driving. Initial evidence from research conducted by CHOP shows that the decals work to reduce teen crash risk. A couple in Maine have created a pink decal of their own to help keep teens safe in memory of their daughter, Taylor, 15, who was killed in a crash with an inexperienced teen driver behind the wheel.

New Resource Alert: Teen Driver Safety Toolset

In conjunction with Temple University’s Department of Public Health, the Association for Prevention Teaching and Research (APTR) recently released a set of Public Health Learning Modules aimed at advancing public knowledge of policy initiatives, existing and emerging research, and transformative models. Allison E. Curry, PhD, MPH, director of epidemiology and biostatistics at CIRP, developed a module on injury prevention, targeting teen driving.

Colombia and Global Road Safety- Impressive but Still Room to Grow

I recently traveled to Colombia and wanted to share some photos demonstrating the implementation of road safety throughout my trip. There have been some impressive accomplishments but there is still room for improvement.

Trends in Child Injury: An Article Review

I recently came across a new review article on child injury prevention by Drs. Brian Johnston and Beth Ebel at University of Washington. In it, they describe that although overall unintentional injury death among US children aged 0-19 years in 2000-2009 fell by 30%, there is still much work to be done.

Practical Policies to Prevent Injury & Manage Acute Care

In a recent study from CIRP@CHOP, we examined the potential impact on the healthcare system associated with increases in the number of young people with health insurance. We found a potential for more than 730,000 additional medically attended injuries annually, or a 6.1 percent increase, if all currently uninsured children and young adults become insured and if these newly insured youth access medical care in ways similar to those who already have insurance.

Crash Data Collection: Keeping Focus on Children

Today, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is holding a public meeting to gather input on its efforts to significantly upgrade the National Automotive Sampling System (NASS) for the first time since NASS’s inception in the 1970’s. NASS collects data on a nationally representative sample of police-reported motor vehicle traffic crashes and related injuries, and therefore plays a pivotal role in research, legislation, and policy. CIRP@CHOP has been working with NHTSA since 2007 to develop the National Child Occupant Special Study (NCOSS), a system for collecting supplemental child-specific data as part of NASS-GES (General Estimates System), and will continue to be vocal in ensuring the unique safety needs of children are considered as NASS is modernized.

Research in Action: A Nurse's Role in Injury Prevention

Earlier this month, I was fortunate to attend the 2013 National Meeting of the Safe States Alliance and the Society for Advancement of Violence and Injury Research (SAVIR) , along with colleagues from the Center for Injury Research and Prevention (CIRP) and the University of Pennsylvania. At the Safer Today Safer Tomorrow Conference, researchers, educators and practitioners in the field of injury prevention came together to discuss new research and programs, as well as strategies for effective advocacy.

#TeenSummer! Twitter Chat on Adolescent Summer Safety

CIRP@CHOP's Flaura Winston MD, PhD and Mark Zonfrillo, MD, MSCE (@safetymd) will be special guests for an upcoming Twitter Chat on Adolescent Summer Safety! For many teens, summer is just getting underway. But increased time spent outdoors also comes with increased safety concerns: Sun exposure, swimming, biking, and hiking can all increase the risk of various adolescent injuries. 

Now Online: NJ Decal Law Webinar Video

In a recent post, I described the health policy community’s keen interest in CIRP@CHOP’s research on New Jersey’s GDL “decal” requirement. Later that month the Public Health Law Webinar Series hosted a panel of research and program experts to discuss the NJ GDL Decal requirement.

Focusing on What Counts for Teen Drivers

While motor vehicle crashes remain the leading cause of death for teens, we have made great strides in reducing the number of crashes involving teens behind the wheel. According to a new report released today by CIRP@CHOP and State Farm®, the number of teen driver-related fatalities declined 47 percent in the past six years from a total of 5,889 in 2005 to a total of 3,150 in 2011.

Pages