Public Policy

Disparities in Drowning: Swimming a Joy for Some, Deadly for Others

Each year, 4,000 die from drowning in the US. Many could be prevented through providing basic swimming instruction to at-risk groups that are described in a recent CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Can we teach a generation to swim and break the cycle?

Joining the Health IT Regulation Debate

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently released an important report that will impact how digital health is regulated in the future. The Safety and Administration Act (FDASIA) Health Information Technology Report describes a proposed strategy and recommendations for a health information technology (Health IT) regulatory framework. For many of us involved in digital health, it has become important to listen, as well as to be a part of, the conversation regarding how to achieve a healthy balance between innovation and patient safety.

Inter-agency Model for Israel’s Child Safety Action Plan

Today, we are please to welcome a guest post from Esti Golan, manager of the Israel Child Safety National Action Plan, who shares with us some insight into the planning of this groundbreaking initiative in Israel.

Nations Can Agree on Road Safety

Today we welcome guest blogger T. Bella Dinh-Zarr, PhD, MPH, the U.S. Director of the FIA Foundation, to discuss the upcoming United Nations General Assembly debate about Road Safety, taking place on April 10.

Questioning the Who, What and How of Digital Health Regulation

The digital health world is buzzing with recent news about a proposed bill to reduce U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulation on “low risk” mobile medical technologies, such as health apps for smartphones that provide health education, management and prevention tools for practitioners and patients. The bill, Preventing Regulatory Overreach to Enhance Care Technology (PROTECT) Act of 2014, aims to amend FDA regulatory guidance on mobile health technologies that are of “low risk” to patient safety. Here's what you should know about the bill.

Child Injury Prevention Holiday Wish List

In the spirit of my previous Thanksgiving post about items for which I’m grateful in the pediatric injury world, I thought I’d make my holiday “wish list” for the next year and beyond.

Gun Violence and Children - Bold Action is Imperative

Last year at this time we were enjoying the holiday season unaware of the tragedy about to unfold in Newtown, Connecticut at the Sandy Hook Elementary School. When it happened, it shook us to our core – 20 children along with 6 adults killed in a matter of minutes by a single gunman. In reaction to the emotion CHOP employees felt after Sandy Hook, our CEO, Steve M. Altschuler, MD, commented that, “We cannot let a sense of hopelessness overcome our ability to truly make a difference in an individual child’s life.” For this to stop, for children to stop being injured and killed by gunshot, bold action and change is imperative.

CIRP Giving Thanks

This week, I am especially mindful of what I am thankful for in the world of child injury prevention. Here are my top twelve...

A Pink Decal to Prevent Teen Crashes?

What a difference a few years make. When New Jersey implemented its first-in-the-nation decal provision as part of its Graduated Driver Licensing (GDL) program on May 1, 2010, it ignited a firestorm of protest from some parents and state legislators. Known as Kyleigh’s Law, it requires all 16- to 20-year-olds holding a learner’s permit or intermediate license to display a reflective decal on the front and back license plates of vehicles they are driving. Initial evidence from research conducted by CHOP shows that the decals work to reduce teen crash risk. A couple in Maine have created a pink decal of their own to help keep teens safe in memory of their daughter, Taylor, 15, who was killed in a crash with an inexperienced teen driver behind the wheel.

New Resource Alert: Teen Driver Safety Toolset

In conjunction with Temple University’s Department of Public Health, the Association for Prevention Teaching and Research (APTR) recently released a set of Public Health Learning Modules aimed at advancing public knowledge of policy initiatives, existing and emerging research, and transformative models. Allison E. Curry, PhD, MPH, director of epidemiology and biostatistics at CIRP, developed a module on injury prevention, targeting teen driving.

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