News of the Field

Prioritizing Engagement and Effectiveness in Digital Health

Two overarching themes are beginning to emerge in digital health that are important to public health and align well with CIRP@CHOP’s own digital health research: engagement and effectiveness. Although not new to the digital health research field, they are becoming a priority.

Teens and Distracted Walking

Our team came across this great infographic from Safe Kids about pedestrian safety -- “How Does a Teenager Cross the Road?”. Based on over 34,000 observations and discussion groups with more than 2,400 students during the 2012-2013 school year, their research indicates that a significant number of high school and middle school students cross the street while distracted, most frequently texting or using headphones. Although older teens account for half of all pedestrian deaths among children age 19 or younger, only one-fifth of teens felt that their age group was the most at risk for pedestrian injuries. To understand these findings, it is helpful to review brain development during adolescence and how teens make decisions.

Children in Hot Cars: No Single Solution to These Preventable Tragedies

This blog explores how a multi-faceted approach is needed to reduce the prevalence of pediatric heat stroke. A combination of education, awareness, and technology can help families avoid these preventable tragedies.

Passing the Baton: CIRP Leadership Transitions

Founder and Scientific Director of CIRP@CHOP looks back at CIRP’s 20-year history as the Center marks an important transition in leadership: a new role for Dennis Durbin, MD, MSCE at the CHOP Research Institute and a new Co-Scientific Director for CIRP@CHOP -- Kristy Arbogast, PhD. Join us in welcoming Dr. Arbogast to her new role.

The Evolving Science of Crash Data Collection

Many of our readers involved in traffic safety research are aware that the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is moving forward with the modernization of the National Automotive Sampling System (NASS) for the first time since NASS’s inception over 40 years ago. CIRP@CHOP has (and will continue to) partner with NHTSA to ensure that the unique safety needs of children are considered as NASS is updated.

Disparities in Drowning: Swimming a Joy for Some, Deadly for Others

Each year, 4,000 die from drowning in the US. Many could be prevented through providing basic swimming instruction to at-risk groups that are described in a recent CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Can we teach a generation to swim and break the cycle?

Drowsy Driving: The Impairment That Can Impact Anyone

Media attention, research dollars, and awareness campaigns often target distracted driving and drunk driving as serious impairments that can impact drivers of any age. Another type of driving impairment that receives less attention, but whose prevalence and consequences are also significant, has suddenly been thrust into the national spotlight through a recent crash involving actor Tracy Morgan. That impairment is drowsy driving.

Joining the Health IT Regulation Debate

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently released an important report that will impact how digital health is regulated in the future. The Safety and Administration Act (FDASIA) Health Information Technology Report describes a proposed strategy and recommendations for a health information technology (Health IT) regulatory framework. For many of us involved in digital health, it has become important to listen, as well as to be a part of, the conversation regarding how to achieve a healthy balance between innovation and patient safety.

Inter-agency Model for Israel’s Child Safety Action Plan

Today, we are please to welcome a guest post from Esti Golan, manager of the Israel Child Safety National Action Plan, who shares with us some insight into the planning of this groundbreaking initiative in Israel.

An Additional Rating System for Infant Child Seats

Today, Consumer Reports released new infant seat ratings from its latest test protocol based on crash testing, ease-of-use, and fit-to-vehicle. After testing 34 commercially available infant seats, the consumer advocates group classified five seats as “basic,” 16 as “better,” and 13 as “best.”

The Child Passenger Safety Technician community should be prepared to field questions from consumer parents who wonder how they should interpret these results. Is their “basic” rated child seat is still safe to use? Here are few points to consider:

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