Injury Recovery

New Resource Alert: Child Injury Recovery Resources in Spanish

Last week Nancy Kassam-Adams, PhD blogged about the need for Spanish-language resources for patients and families. CIRP worked closely with the Center for Pediatric Traumatic Stress at CHOP and the Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children to develop resources to fill this gap.

After The Injury en español: Reaching Spanish-speaking Parents

According to 2012 US Census figures, 53 million people of Latino heritage live in the United States and 74 percent speak Spanish at home, by far the largest language (other than English) in US households. More than 4 million Latino households include children under age 18, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that in 2012 nearly 1 million Latino children received Emergency Department or inpatient hospital care for injury. 

Why Preventing Pediatric Injury Death Is Only Part of the Puzzle

In a letter published today in the Australian & New Zealand Journal of Public Health, I commend the work being done by my pediatric injury prevention research colleagues in New Zealand to help reduce child injury mortality in their country. They developed injury prevention recommendations that were published late last year in the Australian & New Zealand Journal of Public Health using a well-developed European Child Safety Report Card model as a metric for comparison. However, I believe that it is important to further adapt these Report Card metrics and also measure reduction in non-fatal morbidity from injuries in children.

Assessing Acute Stress Symptoms in Children Bilingually

Learn about a new study that assessed the acute stress symptoms of 500 children in three US cities in both English and Spanish. This study contributes to a growing body of research that is helping to develop validated assessment measures in Spanish to help clinicians care for Latino children in the US.

New Symposium: Utilizing Web-Based Programs to Promote Child Health

For those attending the Society of Pediatric Psychology Annual Conference in Philadelphia at the end of March, please take note of a symposium being held from 1:40 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. on Saturday, March 29th featuring members of CIRP's Post-injury Care and Recovery (PICAR) team. Come and join in the discussion, "Utilizing Web-based Programs to Promote Child Health: Primary Prevention, Secondary Prevention, and Treatment," with Meghan Marsac, PhD, and Nancy Kassam Adams, PhD.

The Knockout Game Is No Myth

I recently co-authored a letter that was published in the Lancet with my colleague, Joel Fein, MD, who directs the Violence Intervention Program in the Emergency Department at CHOP, to help raise awareness of a dangerous trend.

Empirical Evidence Supports Cognitive Rest After Concussion

Published this week, a study in Pediatrics provides evidence for cognitive rest as an effective strategy following a concussion. Naomi Brown, MD, a Sports Medicine specialist at CHOP, found that study participants with the highest levels of activity suffered longer duration of symptoms than those with lower levels of cognitive activity. Kristy Arbogast, PhD speaks with Dr. Brown about the research questions that would help clinicians, as well as a new assessment tool called the Cognitive Activity Scale.

Child Injury Prevention Holiday Wish List

In the spirit of my previous Thanksgiving post about items for which I’m grateful in the pediatric injury world, I thought I’d make my holiday “wish list” for the next year and beyond.

Poor Quality of Life for Children with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

I recently co-authored a study that identified certain groups of children with poor quality of life outcomes after suffering a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Children from low-income families, with Medicaid insurance, with less educated parents, or of Hispanic ethnicity were more likely to have poor outcomes at follow-up when compared to other children.

Helmets Prevent Concussions? Not So Fast

Although well-intentioned, helmets and playing/practice standards such as hit counts have jumped ahead of the science in concussion prevention. This and other topics are covered in release of the Institute of Medicine’s report on youth sports-related concussion, released today.

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