Injury Recovery

Assessing Acute Stress Symptoms in Children Bilingually

Learn about a new study that assessed the acute stress symptoms of 500 children in three US cities in both English and Spanish. This study contributes to a growing body of research that is helping to develop validated assessment measures in Spanish to help clinicians care for Latino children in the US.

New Symposium: Utilizing Web-Based Programs to Promote Child Health

For those attending the Society of Pediatric Psychology Annual Conference in Philadelphia at the end of March, please take note of a symposium being held from 1:40 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. on Saturday, March 29th featuring members of CIRP's Post-injury Care and Recovery (PICAR) team. Come and join in the discussion, "Utilizing Web-based Programs to Promote Child Health: Primary Prevention, Secondary Prevention, and Treatment," with Meghan Marsac, PhD, and Nancy Kassam Adams, PhD.

The Knockout Game Is No Myth

I recently co-authored a letter that was published in the Lancet with my colleague, Joel Fein, MD, who directs the Violence Intervention Program in the Emergency Department at CHOP, to help raise awareness of a dangerous trend.

Empirical Evidence Supports Cognitive Rest After Concussion

Published this week, a study in Pediatrics provides evidence for cognitive rest as an effective strategy following a concussion. Naomi Brown, MD, a Sports Medicine specialist at CHOP, found that study participants with the highest levels of activity suffered longer duration of symptoms than those with lower levels of cognitive activity. Kristy Arbogast, PhD speaks with Dr. Brown about the research questions that would help clinicians, as well as a new assessment tool called the Cognitive Activity Scale.

Child Injury Prevention Holiday Wish List

In the spirit of my previous Thanksgiving post about items for which I’m grateful in the pediatric injury world, I thought I’d make my holiday “wish list” for the next year and beyond.

Poor Quality of Life for Children with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

I recently co-authored a study that identified certain groups of children with poor quality of life outcomes after suffering a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Children from low-income families, with Medicaid insurance, with less educated parents, or of Hispanic ethnicity were more likely to have poor outcomes at follow-up when compared to other children.

Helmets Prevent Concussions? Not So Fast

Although well-intentioned, helmets and playing/practice standards such as hit counts have jumped ahead of the science in concussion prevention. This and other topics are covered in release of the Institute of Medicine’s report on youth sports-related concussion, released today.

Video FAQs on Concussion: Short Videos Address Common Questions

In order to address the most common questions about pediatric concussion that CHOP concussion specialists hear from patients, parents, school and coaches, the Minds Matter team at CIRP@CHOP created eight short videos ranging in length from 1.5 to 3.5 minutes. The videos are simple, direct and provide answers in relatable terms for families.

Improving Outcomes for Seriously Injured Children

When we think about trauma and prevention we often focus on death as the outcome. However, functional disability from trauma is far more common than death and can cause long-term physical and cognitive impairment despite inpatient rehabilitation. In fact, 95 percent of children and young adults survive moderate to severe trauma. How can we best measure these impairments in a standardized manner? What happens to these patients when they leave the hospital and inpatient rehabilitation? Are we doing all we can to ensure these children recover to reach their fullest potential?

Posttraumatic Stress After Pediatric Injury: What Practitioners Should Know

As a pediatric nurse, I know that the impact of injury for children and parents can sometimes go beyond the physical wound and that a full recovery can require more than the excellent medical care we now know how to provide. According to a recent research review in JAMA: Pediatrics by my colleague, Nancy Kassam-Adams, PhD, a substantial body of research shows that posttraumatic stress (PTS) symptoms are common after pediatric injury and that these symptoms can affect a child’s physical and functional recovery. As pediatric health practitioners, we play a crucial role in recognizing and addressing PTS reactions in our injured patients.Here's what you can do.

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