Injury Recovery

New Resource Alert: After The Injury or Illness Tipsheets for Siblings in English and Spanish

To help families cope after a sibling has been injured, the Center for Pediatric Traumatic Stress (CPTS) has created evidence-based tipsheets in both English and Spanish. These helpful resources were developed based on recommendations from the CPTS Family Advisory Board.

Concussion Diagnoses in the ED: Ensuring symptoms are not overlooked

In a patient with direct trauma to the head and who presents with clear symptoms, the diagnosis of concussion is generally straightforward. However, it can be much more challenging to diagnose a subtle concussion, particularly among patients with multiple injuries or non-direct head trauma.

Early Intervention After Child Trauma: Do We Know What Works?

When traumatic events affect children we all want to help. In the aftermath of large-scale tragedies, communities are often deluged with donations and offers of assistance, not all of them useful. How to help in a way that is useful and supportive of children’s natural recovery processes is a pressing issue in the field of traumatic stress. Dr. Kassam-Adams proposes a guide to researchers and practitioners to meet the challenge.

Parent Injury Can Cause Stress for a Child

Nearly two decades ago our team was planning a follow-up study with parents of injured children treated in the Emergency Department. In the very first phone interview for the study, I spoke with the mother of a teenager injured in a traffic crash. She was very happy to answer our questions about her son’s recovery but quickly added, “You should be asking about me! My son is doing well now. I am a mess.” She went on to describe feeling worried and afraid every time her son left the house, even though she knew he was not in real danger. This mother’s voice was crucial. She reminded us of the importance of asking about a parent’s own responses to a child’s injury. But what happens to the child when it is the parent who is injured?

New Resource Alert: Child Injury Recovery Resources in Spanish

Last week Nancy Kassam-Adams, PhD blogged about the need for Spanish-language resources for patients and families. CIRP worked closely with the Center for Pediatric Traumatic Stress at CHOP and the Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children to develop resources to fill this gap.

After The Injury en español: Reaching Spanish-speaking Parents

According to 2012 US Census figures, 53 million people of Latino heritage live in the United States and 74 percent speak Spanish at home, by far the largest language (other than English) in US households. More than 4 million Latino households include children under age 18, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that in 2012 nearly 1 million Latino children received Emergency Department or inpatient hospital care for injury. 

Why Preventing Pediatric Injury Death Is Only Part of the Puzzle

In a letter published today in the Australian & New Zealand Journal of Public Health, I commend the work being done by my pediatric injury prevention research colleagues in New Zealand to help reduce child injury mortality in their country. They developed injury prevention recommendations that were published late last year in the Australian & New Zealand Journal of Public Health using a well-developed European Child Safety Report Card model as a metric for comparison. However, I believe that it is important to further adapt these Report Card metrics and also measure reduction in non-fatal morbidity from injuries in children.

Assessing Acute Stress Symptoms in Children Bilingually

Learn about a new study that assessed the acute stress symptoms of 500 children in three US cities in both English and Spanish. This study contributes to a growing body of research that is helping to develop validated assessment measures in Spanish to help clinicians care for Latino children in the US.

New Symposium: Utilizing Web-Based Programs to Promote Child Health

For those attending the Society of Pediatric Psychology Annual Conference in Philadelphia at the end of March, please take note of a symposium being held from 1:40 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. on Saturday, March 29th featuring members of CIRP's Post-injury Care and Recovery (PICAR) team. Come and join in the discussion, "Utilizing Web-based Programs to Promote Child Health: Primary Prevention, Secondary Prevention, and Treatment," with Meghan Marsac, PhD, and Nancy Kassam Adams, PhD.

The Knockout Game Is No Myth

I recently co-authored a letter that was published in the Lancet with my colleague, Joel Fein, MD, who directs the Violence Intervention Program in the Emergency Department at CHOP, to help raise awareness of a dangerous trend.

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