Child Traumatic Stress

Proactive Crisis Management and Recovery For School Shootings

It can be a formidable task to help a community to develop and practice a crisis management and response plan for a mass casualty event for one key reason: The inherent conflict in preparing for something that we hope will never occur. Here are key things to consider when developing a response.

Consider This Framework for Treating PTS in Children After Acute Medical Trauma

Working at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, I have been impressed by our medical teams’ efforts to support children and families by paying attention to both their physical treatment and recovery, as well as their emotional recovery. In assessing our patients for medical treatment, many questions need to be answered for our team to help promote optimal recovery and to minimize negative emotional reactions such as posttraumatic stress. We recently developed a new model to help organize our thought processes and questions around recovery from medical events and to fuel future research in understanding factors that are associated with child outcomes.

Early Intervention After Child Trauma: Do We Know What Works?

When traumatic events affect children we all want to help. In the aftermath of large-scale tragedies, communities are often deluged with donations and offers of assistance, not all of them useful. How to help in a way that is useful and supportive of children’s natural recovery processes is a pressing issue in the field of traumatic stress. Dr. Kassam-Adams proposes a guide to researchers and practitioners to meet the challenge.

Parent Injury Can Cause Stress for a Child

Nearly two decades ago our team was planning a follow-up study with parents of injured children treated in the Emergency Department. In the very first phone interview for the study, I spoke with the mother of a teenager injured in a traffic crash. She was very happy to answer our questions about her son’s recovery but quickly added, “You should be asking about me! My son is doing well now. I am a mess.” She went on to describe feeling worried and afraid every time her son left the house, even though she knew he was not in real danger. This mother’s voice was crucial. She reminded us of the importance of asking about a parent’s own responses to a child’s injury. But what happens to the child when it is the parent who is injured?

New Resource Alert: Child Injury Recovery Resources in Spanish

Last week Nancy Kassam-Adams, PhD blogged about the need for Spanish-language resources for patients and families. CIRP worked closely with the Center for Pediatric Traumatic Stress at CHOP and the Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children to develop resources to fill this gap.

After The Injury en español: Reaching Spanish-speaking Parents

According to 2012 US Census figures, 53 million people of Latino heritage live in the United States and 74 percent speak Spanish at home, by far the largest language (other than English) in US households. More than 4 million Latino households include children under age 18, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that in 2012 nearly 1 million Latino children received Emergency Department or inpatient hospital care for injury. 

Violence Prevention Initiative Offers an Introduction to Trauma-informed Care Webinar

The Violence Prevention Initiative is offering an introductory webinar to trauma-informed care aimed at pediatric clinical care providers on Wednesday, June 4, 2014.

Peer Support, Mental Health, and Violence

As we commemorate today as National Children's Mental Health Awareness Day, it helps to bring awareness to the significant relationship between violence and mental health. Although not all mental and behavioral health issues cause youth to become violent, some can increase the risk of violence for children. Therefore, awareness of mental health issues in children is pivotal to reducing the impact of their exposure to and involvement with violence.

For Healthcare Providers, Healing Doesn’t End With the Patient

Traumatic stress in healthcare providers may seem like "part of the job," but it can have a profound impact on their professional and personal lives. This post provides actionable steps for healthcare providers to manage their own traumatic stress reactions in the clinical setting.

Why Preventing Pediatric Injury Death Is Only Part of the Puzzle

In a letter published today in the Australian & New Zealand Journal of Public Health, I commend the work being done by my pediatric injury prevention research colleagues in New Zealand to help reduce child injury mortality in their country. They developed injury prevention recommendations that were published late last year in the Australian & New Zealand Journal of Public Health using a well-developed European Child Safety Report Card model as a metric for comparison. However, I believe that it is important to further adapt these Report Card metrics and also measure reduction in non-fatal morbidity from injuries in children.

Pages