Child Passenger Safety

Reaching the Remaining 35 Percent of Sub-optimally Restrained Children

One in three U.S. children ages 4 through 7 years are still not riding in a child restraint system when they are passengers in motor vehicles, according to the 2011 National Survey on Use of Booster Seats. To better protect these children, we developed and evaluated Boosting Restraint Norms, a community-led social marketing campaign that emerged from a multi-phase line of research conducted at CIRP.

Over the Top - The Case for the Tether

Recently, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) conducted in-person surveys of 479 drivers with forward-facing child restraints equipped with tether anchors. The study found that 56% of these restraints were installed with the tether, and 39% had correct installation of the tether. The drivers’ most common self-reported barriers to tether use were that that they did not know about the tether or they did not know how to use it. Read why its important to emphasize the top tether in parent education...

Topics from Advances in Child Injury Prevention

Two weeks ago, The Center for Child Injury Prevention Studies (CChIPS) held its annual Advances in Child Injury Prevention (ACIP) conference in Plymouth, Michigan. ACIP presents the latest research in traffic safety for children and adolescents. Attendance at ACIP has grown every year, this time attracting over 100 participants from 38 companies. Presenters include investigators funded by CChIPS as well as external investigators who are invited by CChIPS to update the participants on relevant new work. This year’s topics included...

Using the Lab to Improve Tools for Child Restraint System Safety Design

I recently received practical questions from an audience of Child Passenger Safety (CPS) technicians about how they should share with parents the results of my on-going research. The short answer is: continue to educate parents exactly as you have been doing using current National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) guidelines. Child safety seats and booster seats, as they are, are very effective at protecting children in crashes. However, until all preventable injuries have been eliminated, we will strive to continue to reduce that risk. One way is to improve the tools we use to design child restraint systems...

Putting the Rear Seat First

Seventy percent of rear seat occupants are children and adolescents, so it’s important to consider their unique safety needs as part of any improvements to the rear seat. Released today, a new CPS Issue Report provides recommendations for research and policy to help guide traffic safety colleagues in their consideration of priorities for safety in the rear seat, especially as it pertains to NHTSA’s Request for Comment to identify needed improvements to the New Car Assessment Program.

A Global Perspective on Child Passenger Safety

As a certified Child Passenger Safety (CPS) technician and an Outreach Specialist here at CIRP@CHOP, I help researchers translate research findings into practical recommendations and messages. To effectively reach our end users, which are typically parents, we need to consider how their beliefs and motivations impact how they receive and interpret our messages. I recently read a post on the Safe Kids blog that put this idea into practice on a global scale.

A Snapshot of Child Restraint Misuse

As one of my particular research interests revolves around the proper use of child restraint systems (CRS), I wanted to share with you what we know today about CRS misuse in the United States. Studies from Safe Kids USA and NHTSA highlight common types of CRS misuse, but we also need to understand the potential consequences of these errors.

How Parents Can Help Injury Researchers

Over the past 15 years, through both the Partners for Child Passenger Safety (PCPS) study and the National Child Occupant Special Study (NCOSS), CHOP researchers and our partners have been dedicated to creating a system to collect supplemental crash data specific to children. Although collecting this data for a large population of children is challenging, it’s important to understand the mechanisms by which children are injured to determine how best to protect them in car crashes. Police crash reports provide a glimpse into this data, but digging deeper to understand pre- and post-event details offers a more complete picture of child injury.

Looking Forward to Lifesavers in Denver, Part One

Plane tickets, hotel reservations and registrations are booked for a strong CIRP@CHOP presence at the Lifesavers Conference. I hope we’ll see you in Denver on April 14th to 16th. Lifesavers attendees will be among the first to hear about our ongoing research to inform targeted engineering, policy and education countermeasures to reduce injuries and deaths among child motor vehicle occupants in three separate presentations.

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