Child Passenger Safety

Is There a Difference in Child Passenger Safety Practices Between Mothers and Fathers?

Historically, there has been limited research on the child passenger safety practices of mother versus father drivers.

Child Injury Prevention Holiday Wish List

In the spirit of my previous Thanksgiving post about items for which I’m grateful in the pediatric injury world, I thought I’d make my holiday “wish list” for the next year and beyond.

Remember Child Injury Prevention for #Giving Tuesday

Most childhood injuries– unintentional and intentional-- are preventable through evidence-based public health policies, awareness and education, as well as practical engineering and technology solutions. But this action requires translational research. And this research relies on concerned citizens and members of industry, like you, that care about children’s health and well-being. Choose to support child injury prevention when you support #Giving Tuesday.

CIRP Giving Thanks

This week, I am especially mindful of what I am thankful for in the world of child injury prevention. Here are my top twelve...

2014 Lifesavers Conference – Registration is Open

CIRP@CHOP staff is looking forward to presenting in and attending the workshops at the national Lifesavers Conference on April 27-29, 2014 in Nashville, TN.

Buyer Beware: When One Study Contradicts All the Rest

A recently published research article seemingly contradicted a body of research supporting belt-positioning booster seats as protective for children in crashes, suggesting instead a higher risk of injury to the neck and thorax for children in boosters as compared to belts alone. Upon further review, there were several methodological concerns with the study, highlighting the significance of taking a critical look at new research, particularly that which contradicts many studies before it.

Collaborating to Improve Car Seat Safety

Although a recent New York Times article on child restraint system misuse cautioned that car seat manufacturers and automakers do not collaborate on safety solutions, this partnership is thriving through CIRP@CHOP's Center for Child Injury Prevention Studies (CChIPS).

The Biomechanics Behind Child Passenger Safety

If you are a Research in Action reader in the field of child passenger safety, you know the safest ways to properly restrain a child in a motor vehicle and may even work to educate parents on this topic. What may be less obvious, however, is the complex body of biomechanical engineering research behind the current best practice recommendations.

Minimizing ‘Permissive Sub-optimal Restraint’

This month, Safe Kids released an interesting report based on a recent survey of more than 1,000 parents and caregivers with children 10 years and younger. Nearly one in four respondents stated that they have driven without their child in a car seat or booster seat. Even more concerning was that some parents are comfortable with keeping their children inappropriately restrained under certain conditions, including: during shorter trips, when driving at night, if in a rush, or if trying to ‘reward’ the child. This ‘permissive sub-optimal restraint’ was seen more frequently in certain subgroups of parents including those who were younger or with higher education and household income.

Trends in Child Injury: An Article Review

I recently came across a new review article on child injury prevention by Drs. Brian Johnston and Beth Ebel at University of Washington. In it, they describe that although overall unintentional injury death among US children aged 0-19 years in 2000-2009 fell by 30%, there is still much work to be done.

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